Tag Archives: Wind Energy Ordinances

Norfolk Daily News: Reasonable wind regulations should be goal

Madison County officials — including members of the county board and the joint planning commission — have been prudent in taking their time before moving ahead with possible changes to the county’s regulations governing wind energy . . . Our desire is that Madison County be a place where reasonable restrictions are adopted that provide a level of reassurance and protection for those who aren’t big fans — pardon the pun — of the turbines in the countryside. Yet we want Madison County to be a place where its natural wind energy potential can be developed in order to provide additional property tax revenue, and jobs during the construction period and once operating. Read more here

Map: World Atlas

UPDATE: AUGUST 18
Madison County gets input on wind regulations, by Jerry Guenther, Norfolk Daily News
On Thursday evening, the Madison County Joint Planning Commission continued discussions on the regulations, with hopes of hosting a public hearing on them next month. If there are no major changes based on the input from the hearing, the regulations could be forwarded to the board of commissioners for consideration in October.

RESOURCES: CENTER FOR RURAL AFFAIRS 

ALSO HAPPENING IN NEBRASKA

Renewable energy can charge up rural economies

By Mark Mahoney, nwestiowa.com

Lucas Nelsen

REGIONAL—The Center for Rural Affairs is strongly supportive of renewable energy. Those words come from Lucas Nelsen, policy program associate for the Lyons, NE-based nonprofit organization, which earlier this year released, “Powering Iowa: Rural Perspectives on Iowa’s Renewable Energy Transformation,” a research report examining renewable energy development in the Hawkeye State. Nelsen explained why the center is in favor of renewable energy.
Continue here.

Center for Rural Affairs Releases Information Guide: Wind Energy Ordinances

Introduction
Wind turbines are multiplying across the U.S., and most are installed in rural areas overlooking crops, cattle, timber, and lakes. Rural communities have experienced several benefits from the development of wind energy, but the growth of the industry has also presented a challenge in the form of local regulations that may be insufficient or out-of-date.

Wind ordinances on the city, county, and state levels may be hard to understand, whether you are an expert or just becoming familiar with the industry. The Center for Rural Affairs has gathered some helpful items to note when reviewing ordinances. Download the guide here.