Tag Archives: Vox

A new book ranks the top 100 solutions to climate change. The results are surprising

A chat with Paul Hawken about his ambitious new effort to “map, measure, and model” global warming solutions. By David Roberts, Vox

Unlike most popular books on climate change, it is not a polemic or a collection of anecdotes and exhortations. In fact, with the exception of a few thoughtful essays scattered throughout, it’s basically a reference book: a list of solutions, ranked by potential carbon impact, each with cost estimates and a short description. A set of scenarios show the cumulative potential. It is fascinating, a powerful reminder of how narrow a set of solutions dominates the public’s attention. Alternatives range from farmland irrigation to heat pumps to ride-sharing.

The number one solution, in terms of potential impact? A combination of educating girls and family planning, which together could reduce 120 gigatons of CO2-equivalent by
2050 — more than on and offshore wind power combined (99 GT). Read more here.

[Wind turbines are ranked #2 and solar farms #8].

Lexington enters into solar energy partnership

By Ben Schwartz, Lexington Clipper-Herald

Downtown Lexington, Nebraska

LEXINGTON, Neb. – The Lexington City Council dealt with a range of projects Tuesday at their regular meeting, perhaps chief among them a partnership in what Mayor John Fagot called the biggest solar energy project in the state of Nebraska. The council voted unanimously to enter into a power purchase agreement with Sol Systems, a solar energy company. Sol will build a five-megawatt capacity solar panel array on city-owned land north of the Greater Lexington addition. Fagot noted that the city isn’t purchasing and won’t maintain any of the equipment, and will retain ownership of the land. Continue reading.

Photo: Downtown Lexington, Nebraska

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
EIA: Monthly renewable generation beat levels from previous year, Utility Dive
Data through June shows that renewable generation has surpassed levels from previous years in every month so far this year, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports
U.S. solar PV prices hit “all-time low”, at rooftop and utility-scale, ReNew Economy
The falling costs of US solar power, in 7 charts, Vox
Ohio solar power has moved from cottage industry to growth industry, Cleveland.Com
Survey: Consumers Ready to Embrace Renewables, Electric Co-op Today
South Dakota plans to build a 201-megawatt wind farm on 36,000 acres, Finance & Commerce
MidAmerican Energy moves forward with $3.6 billion investment in Wind XI project, AltEnergy Magazine
things you didn’t know about the wind for schools program, Windpower Engineering Development

This new transmission line will help unleash wind energy in the Great Plains

Photo by Michael Kappel

Photo by Michael Kappel

By David Roberts, Vox

Wind and sunlight have many advantages as fuel sources, but one big drawback is that they aren’t portable. You can’t carry them to a power plant. You have to build the power plant wherever you find them.

That puts the US in an awkward situation, because the most intense wind and sunlight tend to be found in remote, low-population areas — think the sunny desert Southwest or the windy Great Plains.

Continue reading.

In Wisconsin, rural co-ops powering state’s solar growth

By Kari Lydersen, Midwest Energy News

Sheep graze at the site of one of Wisconsin-based Vernon Electric Cooperative's solar arrays. Photo by Vernon Electric Cooperative

Sheep graze at the site of one of Wisconsin-based Vernon Electric Cooperative’s solar arrays. Photo by Vernon Electric Cooperative

In Wisconsin, where state regulators and utilities have been perceived as cool to renewable energy, rural cooperatives are making major investments in solar power. According to solar installers and experts, co-ops, which aren’t subject to regulation by the state’s Public Service Commission, are being more responsive to their customers’ interest in solar . . . “It’s really impressive to see all over the country how cooperatives are embracing solar and finding new ways to implement it,” added Andy Olsen, with the Environmental Law & Policy Center.

Read the entire article.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING / VIEWING
Rural electric co-ops, traditional bastions of coal, are getting into solar, by David Roberts, Vox

Environmental Law & Policy Center’s Mission Statement – YouTube Video

Rural electric co-ops, traditional bastions of coal, are getting into solar

By David Roberts, Vox

Shutterstock Image

Shutterstock Image

In the US, rural areas and constituencies have typically weighed against progress on clean energy. But that may be changing. A new story out of Wisconsin illustrates that a slow, tentative shift is underway, as rural electricity consumers and the utilities that serve them take a new look at the benefits of solar power. In fact, if you squint just right, you can even glimpse a future in which rural America is at the vanguard of decarbonization. The self-reliance and local jobs enabled by renewable energy are of unique value in rural areas, and rural leaders are beginning to recognize that solar isn’t just for elitist coastal hippies any more.

Click here to continue reading.  

To learn more about Rural Energy For America Program (REAP) grants mentioned in the article, click here. May 2nd is the deadline for the current round of grant applications.