Tag Archives: Virginia Clean Economy Act

Lots of ‘renewable’ options for energy consumers, but why are so few of them any good?

By Ivy Main, Virginia Mercury

Virginia residents who want to do right by the planet are confronted with a bewildering array of renewable energy and “green power” options. Unfortunately, few of these programs actually deliver renewable energy. People who want the gold standard — electricity from new wind and solar projects — are completely out of luck if their utility is Dominion Energy Virginia or Appalachian Power. 

To understand how there can be so many options and none of them good, we first have to talk about renewable energy certificates.  RECs are a topic that is way more interesting than it sounds because — well, it would have to be, wouldn’t it? RECs are how we know that some electricity can be attributed to a renewable source. If you want to know what kind of renewable energy your utility is buying, or if you yourself want to buy renewable energy, RECs matter. Read more here.

About Ivy Main


Ivy Main is a lawyer and a longtime volunteer with the Sierra Club’s Virginia chapter. A former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency employee, she is currently the Sierra Club’s renewable energy chairperson. 

 

Top Photo: Dominion Energy’s Whitehouse solar farm in Louisa County. Under the Virginia Clean Economy Act, after 2025 most of the Renewable Energy Certificates retired by Dominion Energy Virginia and Appalachian Power will come from Virginia wind and solar facilities.

Recommended Resource: State Renewable Portfolio Standards and Goals, National Conference Of State Legislatures

IN NEBRASKA

Conservancy charts a solar showcase on the coalfields of Central Appalachia

By Elizabeth McGowen, Energy News Network

When Danny Van Clief chose a career in solar energy, he wasn’t seeking a turbulence-free glide path. Instead, the CEO of Sun Tribe Development wanted the freedom to jump with both feet into formidable challenges — ones that might spook other developers.

That pluck has landed his Charlottesville company the opportunity to be the first to generate large-scale renewable power on the coalfields of Central Appalachia. If the bold venture announced this week comes to fruition, roughly 550 acres of deforested minelands sprinkled across an expansive Nature Conservancy preserve will generate up to 75 megawatts of solar energy within two to three years. Continue reading here.

Photo Credit: Brad Kreps / The Nature Conservancy

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY IN NEBRASKA

Featured Resources
Nebraska’s Climate Solutions: See how The Nature Conservancy is finding hope for the future in all corners of Nebraska.

Photo: Nature Conservancy’s 50-kilowatt off-grid solar system at the Niobrara Valley Preserve, one of the Conservancy’s largest in the U.S. The Nebraska Environmental Trust awarded a grant for the project  It was designed by Morrissey Engineering of Omaha and installed by SWT Energy in collaboration with Sentry Electric of Lincoln, Nebraska.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

About The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world’s toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at an unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 72 countries and territories: 38 by direct conservation impact and 34 through partners, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit: www.nature.org

FREE CERES & IIGCC WEBINAR 

The Role of Natural Climate Solutions in Corporate Climate Commitments: A Spotlight on Investor Engagement

This webinar on May 18 at 10 a.m. will launch a new publication by Ceres and IIGCC, “The Role of Natural Climate Solutions in Corporate Climate Commitments: A Brief for Investors.” Developed in collaboration with investors, the brief provides asset owners and managers with guidance for engaging portfolio companies on the use of NCS in their climate commitments.

Website Links

Inspiring story from Illinois: How fourth-graders provided the spark for solar panels at Big Hollow campus

By Mick Zawislak, Daily Herald

The installation of solar panels on the Big Hollow Elementary District 38 campus in Ingleside is a lesson in persistence prompted by fourth-graders. Spread along the rolling terrain in two sections — the smaller near the school bus parking lot and the larger on the west side of Wilson Road — the panels will produce enough energy to cover about 85% of the district’s power needs and save about $90,000 a year. Continue reading here.

SEIA Resource: Solar Power Purchase Agreements
More Illinois NewsMaking Galesburg model city for solar, Review Atlas 

IN NEBRASKA

NEWS FROM OTHER STATES

MULTI-STATE SOLAR AGGREGATION

Standard Solar gets creative to finance this 18-rooftop, multi-state solar portfolio for Iron Mountain Inc, Solar Builder Magazine

“Through our partnership with Standard Solar, we have been able to build a holistic program that allows Iron Mountain to seamlessly install on-site solar in multiple states. This program is helping Iron Mountain progress towards meeting their environmental goals of RE100 and the Science Based Target Initiative in a cost effective and simple to implement method,” said Lauren Fitch CBRE Energy Manager for Iron Mountain. Standard Solar also partnered with OnSwitch, whose patented AI-powered SkyQuotes platform makes it simpler for solar developers and building owners to evaluate, buy/finance and install commercial solar energy solutions at a guaranteed lowest price, to help maximize cost savings for the projects.

 CLIMATE RISKS & RESILIENCE

Trend: Corporate climate reporting gets physical, contributed GreenBiz article by Lauren Smart, Managing Director, Global Head of ESG Commercial at Trucost, part of S&P Global.

What will companies gain from reporting physical risks? Risk mitigation, for starters. Research by Trucost highlights the scale of corporate exposure: almost 60 percent of companies in the S&P 500 (market capitalization of $18 trillion) and more than 40 percent in the S&P Global 1200 ($27.3 trillion) hold assets at high risk of physical climate change impacts. Identifying these exposures and building business continuity and resilience plans is critical. It’s not just companies in the obvious sectors, such as agricultural value chains or resource-intensive ones, that are vulnerable. For many U.S. financial companies, which may have thought their exposure to climate risks was minimal, 2012’s Superstorm Sandy was a wake-up call.

GLOBAL ENERGY TRANSITION

 Previously Posted