Tag Archives: Tim Luchsinger

Renewable Energy Purchase in Grand Island

 By Amanda Kerstetter, NBC Nebraska

Photo: NBC Nebraska

Photo: NBC Nebraska

Excerpt
“We have our primary source right now is coal, we do have some natural gas, this wind energy will obviously be a bigger factor in that portfolio that we have,” said Tim Luchsinger of the Grand Island Utilities Department . . . “Environmentally, it is a clean source, it’s definitely the way of the future and it’s going to be good for Grand Island, it’s going to be good for Nebraska and it’s going to be good for the country,” said Luchsinger.

Read the entire story here.

SEE ALSO
City of Grand Island announces first renewable energy purchase, signs agreement with Invenergy Nebraska wind power, PRNewswire

Update: Grand Island Announces First Renewable Energy Purchase

By Megan Johnson, Reporter for NTV

Photo: NTV

Photo: NTV

Buying in to wind energy now might not make much difference for Grand Island Utilities customers in the near future, but officials say it could pay off down the road.

Twenty turbines will make up Prairie Breeze Phase III when it’s finished in 2016, turning in the wind and creating power for Grand Island.

“We were asked to participate in a wind energy project up at Elgin, Nebraska; it’s actually the third phase of the project up there,” explains GI Utilities Director Tim Luchsinger.

Continue reading.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
Gering to update wind, solar codes: Interest in alternative energy on the rise, KOTA TV

City’s coal-fired power plant entering its twilight

by Tracy Overstreet, The Grand Island Independent

Grand Island’s coal-fired power plant, the Platte Generating Station, has been a rock star.

“Grand Island has never run a plant as long and as hard as we have Platte,” Utilities Director Tim Luchsinger said.

The 100-megawatt plant went on line in 1982 and has provided low-cost, baseload-level electricity ever since.

But a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Monday upholding the Environmental Protection Agency’s enforcement of greener energy policies has raised questions about the future of coal-fired plants such as Platte.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if we don’t see a lot of operation of Platte by 2030,” Luchsinger said. “It may be retired by then.”

That projected retirement may come as a surprise to some, particularly as the plant undergoes a $42 million pollution-control upgrade that will be complete in November. But it’s not so surprising to those in the energy industry.

To continue reading, click here:
http://www.theindependent.com/news/local/city-s-coal-fired-power-plant-entering-its-twilight/article_00459ea2-ff49-11e3-be5e-0019bb2963f4.html