Tag Archives: solar energy development in Nebraska

Solar energy to power Atkinson waste water plant

By Jerry Guenther, Norfolk Daily News

On Thursday, Jan. 10, the City of Atkinson will celebrate the conversion of its waste water plant to operate entirely on solar energy. Erika Young, marketing and external affairs manager for GenPro Energy Solutions, said the City of Atkinson wanted a tracked system that could provide enough energy to offset the energy consumption of its water treatment plant. GenPro Energy Solutions of Piedmont, S.D., was the project developer. Through NPPD’s Buy-Sell Solar Rider, Atkinson will be able to create long-term cash flow for the city through the production of solar energy, Young said. Read more here.

Event Details
What: Atkinson Waste Treatment Plant Solar Array ribbon cutting.
Where: City of Atkinson Waste Water Treatment Plant, 700 S. Main St., Atkinson.
When: Thursday, January 10, 10 a.m.
Cider and cookies will follow the ceremony at the Atkinson Community Center,
206 W. Fifth Street.

Pixabay Photo

Solar Farm taking shape along east 16th Street

By Sam Pimper, Schuyler Sun / Columbus Telegram

Those making their way far enough down the stretch of east 16th Street in Schuyler have likely noticed the work taking place on an expansive 33-acre plot of land. The hours of labor transpiring at the location will soon result in the completion of a green energy project similar to ones in Nebraska cities like Fremont, Lincoln, Central City, Aurora and Lexington. A solar energy farm expected to go live in January 2019 is being erected in the town comprised of less than 10,000 people. Continue reading and view photos here.

Pixabay Photo

City seeking proposals for solar project

By Tony Herman, Hastings Tribune

The city of Hastings is seeking proposals for a 1.5 megawatt solar farm project. Derek Zeisler, Hastings Utilities director of marketing and energy supply, told members of the Hastings Utility board during their regular meeting Thursday HU will disseminate an RFP on Friday for a solar farm project and is asking for those proposals by Nov. 28. “It seems to be a good size for a good price point,” he said of the 1.5 megawatt size of the solar project, which is similar to the power generated by the Central Community College-Hastings wind turbine. Continue reading here.

Photo Credit: Troy Schaben, Assistant City Administrator, Fremont Department of Utilities. First Fremont Solar Farm, 1.55-megawatts. The city completed a second solar farm of the same size in September 2018 to accommodate strong customer demand.

NEBRASKA ALSO IN THE NEWS HERE


Stowe, Okemo resorts to be powered by virtual wind energy, Vermont Biz

Lincoln Clean Energy Photo: Nebraska’s Plum Creek Wind
Farm development, expected to be completed in 2020.

City moves toward solar energy

By Jerry Purvis, Scottsbluff Star-Herald

SCOTTSBLUFF — Scottsbluff could realize some of the lowest electric rates in the nation under an agreement that will bring solar power to all city operations. During its Monday meeting, council members approved a lease agreement with Sol Systems, LLC as part of the city’s five-megawatt solar power project. Sol Systems would then enter into an energy purchase agreement with Nebraska Public Power District for distribution of the solar electricity.
Continue reading here.

NPPD Photo: Scottsbluff Community Solar Project. Through NPPD’s SunWise Program, a total of 135 solar shares were available. Each solar share = 150 kilowatt-hours per month, the minimum participation level. The maximum participation level was the number of solar shares equal to 80% of a customer’s total annual energy consumption. For example, if a customer used an average of 1,000 kilowatt hours per month, 80% = 750 kilowatt-hours or up to five solar shares. All 135 solar shares were spoken for, and customers are now placed on a wait-list. See Solar Examples for additional details.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
Recently Reposted by the Clean Energy Finance Forum: Small Decisions Move Clean Energy Forward in Nebraska

South Sioux City Solar Farm: 2.3-megawatt array (1,200 panels) located on a 21-acre solar park south of the city, alongside C Avenue. The array generates enough energy to provide 5% of South Sioux City’s electrical needs. This is the first Nebraska project for California-based developer Solar City, a Tesla Motors subsidiary.
Archived News StorySolar is South Sioux City’s latest investment in renewables, Sioux City Journal
Photo Credit: Tim Hynds, Sioux City Journal

NEWS FROM OTHER STATES

ELECTRIC BUSES – NEWS & A REPORT

Kearney Hub Opinion: Storage new frontier in race for clean energy

The city of Norfolk is fixing to one-up Kearney on the solar energy front, and we wish Norfolkans the best of luck. Earlier this week, the northeast Nebraska city entered an agreement with Nebraska Public Power District on a venture to build a sizable solar array and link it to an energy storage system. It doesn’t appear as if Norfolk’s array will rival Kearney’s in size, but the size of the system isn’t nearly as important as its ability to successfully plow new ground in the development of green energy. Continue reading here.

Photo: Kearney’s $11 million, 53-acre solar farm, currently the largest in the state.

ALSO OF POTENTIAL INTEREST: NEBRASKA / MIDWEST NEWS

Solar energy farms gaining traction in Nebraska

By Grant Schulte and Tess Williams, Associated Press,
The News & Observer

LINCOLN, NEB. – Solar energy is gaining traction in Nebraska as a growing number of cities adopt the technology, and state officials are looking for ways to help the trend along. The
technology has become so popular that some cities have had to expand their recently built solar farms or build new ones to keep pace with customer demand. Continue reading here.

Photo: Cliff Mesner at Central City’s 500-kilowatt solar array, installed by Mesner Solar Development on an abandoned parking lot.

Industries split over Trump’s tariffs on solar parts, washing machines

By Cole Epley, Omaha World-Herald

Michael Shonka, owner of Omaha-based solar designer and installer Solar Heat and Electric, installed the state’s first community solar project in Central City in 2013. He acknowledges the trade imbalance between Asian manufacturers of solar components and U.S. buyers like himself and his clients but questions why the entire industry should suffer.

“You might think you’re doing something (helpful) but there are very definite unintended consequences” of instituting import tariffs, said Shonka, who is also chair of Nebraskans for Solar. Making panels potentially more expensive will harm the industry as a whole, he said, even if it does give a boost to domestic manufacturers. Read the entire article here.

Photo Credit: The Associated Press

Superior buys into solar power with AEP contract

By Donna Christensen, Hastings Tribune

Meeting Nov. 13, the Superior City Council voted unanimously to sign a contract to authorize the construction of the solar array east of the current waste water treatment plant, on land south of the sewer plant access road and east of the actual sewer plant. The company known as AEP Onsite Partners is expected to begin construction of a 1-megawatt solar array in February 2018, with the new facility operational by May 1, 2018. Read more here.

AEP Energy is a wholly owned subsidiary of American Electric Power Company, one of the largest electric utilities in the United States, and ranked 167 of the Fortune 500.

Also in the News: Omaha-Based Tenaska Inc

The Plan to Build a Giant Water Battery in San Diego County
Voice of San Diego

The project is designed to make money off daily changes in energy prices and provide enough green energy to power 325,000 homes. The project would cost well over $1 billion. The plan is to buy low-priced solar power during the day when it is cheap, and use that electricity to pump water from the existing San Vicente Reservoir uphill to a new, higher-elevation reservoir. When electricity prices rise, water would be released back downhill. As the water falls, it would spin turbines to generate electricity that could be sold at a profit. Some environmentalists are eyeing the project as a way to help the city meet its goal of having 100 percent renewable energy by 2035. The Water Authority’s board will vote this week whether to negotiate with its preferred business partner, a joint venture of Nebraska-based Tenaska and Los Angeles-based Diamond Generating Corporation. Read the entire article here.

Solar energy talks happening in Fremont and Omaha

By Sam Pimper, Fremont Tribune

From 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 19, those gathering at Keene Memorial Library will listen to City Administrator Brian Newton, along with Michael Shonka, another Nebraska solar power advocate, speak about various topics surrounding the Fremont project and solar energy as a whole.

Those unable to attend the Thursday conversation are invited to attend a Smart Energy Talks Nebraska presentation happening from 9 a.m. through 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, at the University of Nebraska at Omaha inside of the Milo Bail Student Center. Click here to read more.

Fremont Solar Rountable
Keene Memorial Library
1030 N Broad Street
Fremont, Nebraska 68025
Questions? Contact organizers:
Jamison Wills jamisonwills@nlcef.org or
Nic Nealy nicnealy@nlcef.org
Nebraska Conservation Education Fund

Top Photo: Telesis Inc solar array in Lincoln. The Fremont Community Solar Farm, under construction on a 10-acre plot of land located south of Jack Sutton Drive, will consist of approximately 5,000 panels and will be operational by the end of 2017. Credit: Lincoln Journal Star

Another Nebraska family installs solar panels in path of Keystone XL pipeline

By Lisa Neff, The Wisconsin Gazette

The “Solar XL” project has completed another installation of solar panels with Nebraska landowners in the path of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline — on the family land of Diana and Byron “Stix” Steskal that they named Prairierose Farm, near Atkinson.

The family partnered with Solar XL project sponsors Bold Nebraska, 350.org, Indigenous Environmental Network, CREDO and Oil Change International to put renewable energy directly in the pipeline’s path. Read more here.