Tag Archives: renewables+storage

Setting the stage for solar + storage

PV Magazine

In this op-ed for pv magazine, Camron Barati explores the trend towards what increasing state-level renewable power and storage targets mean for the U.S. market. The company projects 73 GW of solar PV systems will be installed in the United States from 2018 to 2022. Read more here.

Camron Barati is a Senior Analyst with IHS Markit Technology. Camron is part of the IHS Markit Technology Solar and Energy Storage Group and responsible for researching solar PV and energy storage markets in North America, covering supply chain trends and downstream market dynamics. He is based in Austin, TX. Prior to joining IHS Markit, Camron worked as an associate with GTM Research as part of their solar analyst team. He also has experience working with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Enphase Energy.

Photo Credit: Recurrent Energy

MORE NATIONAL NEWS & AN INTERVIEW 

NEBRASKA NEWS

Solar cars to travel around Fremont as part of challenge, Fremont Tribune

NEWS FROM OTHER STATES

How solar energy helps Mennonites with their mission of global relief

GREEN BUILDING NEWS

Tim O’Brien Homes gears up for construction in zero-energy neighborhood, Milwaukee Business Journal

Siemens Gamesa Makes Headway On Hybridization Of Renewable Energy

Posted by Betsy Lillian, North American Windpower

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE) has commissioned a redox flow energy storage system at its hybrid wind and solar La Plana project near Zaragoza, Spain. According to SGRE, hybrid projects of wind energy, solar PV and other energy sources are becoming a more and more attractive option to drive the energy transition to higher shares of renewable energy. Read more here.

Image: Siemens Gamesa’s La Plana hybrid wind and solar test project near Zaragoza, Spain

MORE ENERGY STORAGE NEWS

GAO study highlights usefulness, gains of U.S. energy storage efforts

MORE EV NEWS

New White Paper: Owning the Benefits of Solar+Storage – Plus More News

By Lew Milford and Robert Sanders, Clean Energy Group

Summary
Current clean energy financing models do not sufficiently serve low-income communities. As a result, solar+storage projects are vastly underrepresented in affordable housing and community facilities, meaning that low-income communities are unable to enjoy the benefits of clean, affordable and resilient power.

This paper describes emerging finance models to address the energy equity challenge and to level the financing playing field. The paper explores additional ownership and financing options for solar+storage projects and low-income communities beyond direct ownership and conventional leasing models. It makes a simple point: there are ownership and financing strategies that can provide many of the economic and other benefits of direct ownership, while overcoming some of the risks and barriers that direct ownership may entail for many project developers. Learn more here.

Upcoming Webinar: New Financing Options for Solar+Storage in Low-Income Communities  

MORE SOLAR+STORAGE NEWS

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

Making Sense of Energy Storage: How Storage Technologies Can Support a Renewable Future

Environment America Report

Energy storage technologies can be an important part of that electric grid of the future, helping to assure reliable access to electricity while supporting America’s transition to 100 percent renewable energy. To get the most benefit out of energy storage, however, policy-makers and the general public need to understand how energy storage works, where and when it is necessary, and how to structure public policy to support the appropriate introduction of energy storage.

Energy storage can make a valuable contribution to our energy system.

  • Energy storage can capture renewable energy produced in excess of the grid’s immediate needs for later use. In California, solar and wind energy plants were forced to halt production more than one-fifth of the time during 2016 because the power they produced was not needed at that moment.
  • Energy storage can help utilities to meet peak demand, potentially replacing expensive peaking plants.
  • Energy storage can extend the service lifetime of existing transmission and distribution infrastructure and reduce congestion in these systems by providing power locally at times of high demand.
  • Energy storage can improve community resilience, providing backup power in case of emergency, or even allowing people to live “off the grid,” relying entirely on clean energy they produce themselves.
  • Energy storage can provide needed ancillary services that help the grid function more efficiently and reliably.

Read the entire news release and download the report here.

ALSO IN THE NEWS