Tag Archives: OPPD’s Board of Directors

OPPD looking to build largest solar farm in Nebraska, still need public’s input

By DeLaun Dillard, KETV

The Omaha Public Power District wants to invest in a brighter and cleaner future, and the company’s CEO says solar energy is the best way to make that happen. “We want to make sure that decisions we make around the future generation, we maintain our current reliability and resiliency,” said OPPD CEO Tim Burke. “That’s important for us as a company but it’s really important for our community. OPPD is looking to build a solar farm with between 400 and 600 megawatts. Read the rest of the post or watch the video here.

OPPD’s board of directors wants public input before they make a final decision on November 14th. Comments will be accepted through the end of the day, Friday, November 8th here.

Photo Credit: American Public Power Association

Omaha utility’s carbon intensity goal obscures ongoing fossil fuel use

Written by Karen Uhlenhuth, Midwest Energy News

The carbon intensity goal passed on a 6-2 vote. The goal could change if the board revisits the issue after January, when newly elected board members — including three clean energy supporters — are seated. A debate about carbon intensity also surfaced recently in Iowa, where
MidAmerican Energy won regulatory approval last week for a 591-megawatt wind farm known as Wind XII. In its application, the utility’s president and CEO, Adam Wright, noted that the project would lower the utility’s carbon intensity to about 638 pounds per net megawatt-hour, compared to 1,839 pounds per megawatt 15 years ago, before it began investing in wind energy. “The carbon intensity, even if it’s calculated correctly, doesn’t mean they’ve reduced their emissions that much,” said Paul Chernick, an attorney representing the Sierra Club in the case.
Read the entire article here.

Pat Hawks / Flickr / Creative Commons Image

Related News Stories

CARBON CAPTURE RESEARCH
DOE spent more than $500M on dead projects, E&E News
Nearly half the $2.7 billion in fossil research money spent by the Department of Energy over the last seven years supported nine carbon capture demonstration projects, the majority of which were canceled or withdrawn.