Tag Archives: Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN)

MEAN to hold Power Supply Planning Meeting and Integrated Resource Plan Review April 21

NFS Note: MEAN proposed increasing their reliance on coal in the 2017 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP). The public will soon have the opportunity to learn about MEAN’s currently proposed power mix with the release of the draft 2022 IRP next week and at the following meeting, posted on MEAN’s website: 

The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) will hold a Power Supply  Committee/Integrated Resource Plan Meeting that will review its 2022 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) April 21 in Lincoln, Neb., at 10 a.m. A virtual option to participate will be available. The meeting is open to the public.

MEAN’s Integrated Resource Plan is filed every five years as required by the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA).

Integrated resource planning is a process for future new energy resources that evaluates the full range of alternatives, including new generating capacity, power purchases, energy conservation and efficiency, cogeneration and heating and cooling applications, and renewable energy resources to provide adequate and reliable service to a utility’s electric customers.

MEAN welcomes member and public input to its IRP. A draft IRP plan will be available on or about April 19, 2022 on MEAN’s IRP pageOnce the draft IRP is publicly available, comments may be submitted by mail to the Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska, Attn. IRP, 8377 Glynoaks Drive, Lincoln, NE 68516 or by email to the address that will be posted on the MEAN IRP webpage.

Comments will be accepted if received during the 25 day comment period beginning on the date of posting of the draft IRP.

Action to adopt the 2022 IRP will be taken at MEAN’s Board of Directors meeting on May 19, which is also open to the public.

Power Supply Committee/Integrated Resource Plan virtual meeting link: https://meet.goto.com/735821061 or telephone at 1-877-309-2073, access code 735-821-061

ABOUT MEAN

The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska is the not-for-profit wholesale electricity supply organization of NMPP Energy. Created in 1981, MEAN provides cost-based power supply, transmission and related services to 69 participating communities in four states: Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska and Wyoming.

MEAN Members/Participants

In Nebraska
Alliance, Ansley, Arnold, Bayard, Beaver City, Benkelman, Blue Hill, Bridgeport, Broken Bow, Burwell, Callaway, Chappell, Crete, Curtis, Fairbury, Falls City, Gering, Grand Island, Grant, Hastings, Imperial, Kimball, Lyman, Mitchell, Morrill, Nebraska City, Neligh, Oxford, Paxton, Pender, Pierce, Plainview, Red Cloud, Scribner, Shickley, Sidney, Snyder, Spencer, Stuart, Trenton, West Point, Wisner

MEAN’s 2050 Carbon Neutral Vision

The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) Board of Directors in 2020 approved a resolution laying out a vision to a carbon neutral power resource portfolio by 2050. The resolution authorizes MEAN’s staff to collaboratively work with the MEAN Power Supply Committee to construct policies around resource planning, portfolio optimization and emissions reduction to support future actions to achieve the 2050 carbon neutral goal.

Click here to download a pdf version of MEAN’s Carbon Neutral 2050 Vision booklet published September 15, 2021.

Previously Posted: Council Debates Future Of Imperial Light Dam, The Imperial Republican
[Imperial’s Public Works Superintendent Pat Davison] presented information on a program through the Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) to partner with a private firm, Sandhills Energy, to install a solar farm in Imperial for electricity production . . . Twenty-two Nebraska communities have expressed interest in the program with the hope of eventual lower electrical costs. 

MEAN’S 2021 COMMUNITY SOLAR REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS & ADDENDUM 

City Pursues Solar Option

By Forrest Hershberger, Publisher, Sun-Telegraph

The concept was first brought before the [Sidney City Council] Dec. 14, 2021. MEAN (Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska), the wholesale electricity provider for Sidney, approved a policy that allows communities to have renewable resources . . . MEAN has issued a Request for Proposal (RFP) on behalf of 10 communities with MEAN staff recommending Sandhills Energy, LLC be awarded the Purchase Power Agreement (PPA). Part of the City’s motivation is to offset potential cost increases. Read more here.

BIPARTISAN INFRASTRUCTURE LAW INVESTMENTS IN RURAL AMERICA CREATING WEALTH

Investments include Revitalizing America’s energy communities: 
In February 2021, President Biden established the Interagency Working Group on Coal and Power Plant Communities and Economic Revitalization to identify and deliver resources to the coal, oil and gas, and power plant communities that have powered our country for generations. The working group identified 25 communities across the country for immediate strategic investment. Since then, member agencies have delivered more than $2.8 billion in federal investment to these communities, including $167 million through USDA’s Renewable Energy for America Program and the Electric Loan Program. The working group also established a resource clearinghouse with more than $181 billion in open and planned funding opportunities for energy communities, to facilitate access to federal programs.

ST. LOUIS IN THE NEWS 

Coal giant Peabody announces joint venture focused on solar power and energy storage, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The renewable industry newcomer has plans to make big moves fairly quickly, by pursuing the development of more than 3.3 gigawatts of solar power and 1.6 gigawatts of battery storage capacity over the next five years, Peabody said in a release.

One gigawatt is enough power to illuminate 110 million LED bulbs.

Council Debates Future Of Imperial Light Dam

By Jan Schultz, The Imperial Republican

[Imperial’s Public Works Superintendent Pat Davison] presented information on a program through the Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) to partner with a private firm, Sandhills Energy, to install a solar farm in Imperial for electricity production . . . Twenty-two Nebraska communities have expressed interest in the program with the hope of eventual lower electrical costs. Read more here.


MEAN’S 2021 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS & ADDENDUM

ABOUT MEAN

The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska is the not-for-profit wholesale electricity supply organization of NMPP Energy. Created in 1981, MEAN provides cost-based power supply, transmission and related services to 69 participating communities in four states: Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska and Wyoming.

MEAN Members/Participants

In Nebraska
Alliance, Ansley, Arnold, Bayard, Beaver City, Benkelman, Blue Hill, Bridgeport, Broken Bow, Burwell, Callaway, Chappell, Crete, Curtis, Fairbury, Falls City, Gering, Grand Island, Grant, Hastings, Imperial, Kimball, Lyman, Mitchell, Morrill, Nebraska City, Neligh, Oxford, Paxton, Pender, Pierce, Plainview, Red Cloud, Scribner, Shickley, Sidney, Snyder, Spencer, Stuart, Trenton, West Point, Wisner

MEAN’s 2050 Carbon Neutral Vision

The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) Board of Directors in 2020 approved a resolution laying out a vision to a carbon neutral power resource portfolio by 2050. The resolution authorizes MEAN’s staff to collaboratively work with the MEAN Power Supply Committee to construct policies around resource planning, portfolio optimization and emissions reduction to support future actions to achieve the 2050 carbon neutral goal.

Click here to download a pdf version of MEAN’s Carbon Neutral 2050 Vision booklet published September 15, 2021.

Statement: Massive oil spill off Southern California coast harming wildlife

Environment America News Release

ORANGE COUNTY, Calif. — A broken pipeline has spewed more than one hundred thousand gallons of oil into the ocean near Huntington Beach, California, closing the beach and forcing the cancellation of the final day of the Pacific Air Show. The spill, discovered Saturday morning, is coming from an oil drilling operation eight miles off the coast, operated by Houston-based Amplify Energy. The pipeline, formerly operated by Shell oil, has been in place since the 1980s. The Coast Guard has been called in for emergency clean-up, since the oil has rendered the coastline too dangerous for humans and marine wildlife. Read more here.

Related

NEW STUDY SHOWS AIR POLLUTION’S HARM TO HUMAN HEALTH

New report: More than one in six Americans experienced greater than 100 days of polluted air in 2020, Environment America

‘Trouble in the Air’ study shows where particulate matter and ozone pollution are harming human health in the U.S. “Air pollution can be just as dangerous for our health as smoking,” said Wendy Wendlandt, President of Environment America Research & Policy Center. “We learned in the 1960s that cigarettes were bad for us and we started to do something about it. Today, air pollution causes hundreds of thousands of people who never took up smoking to die too early each year. It’s past time to do something about that.” 

Download Trouble In The Air 

CARBON POLLUTION & LOCAL DECARBONIZATION LIMITS / LONGTERM INITIATIVES

South Sioux City’s Solar Park

Previously posted article discusses specific decarbonization limits for Nebraska communities and South Sioux City’s independent path to 100% renewable energy:

  • Nebraska solar farm highlights tension between cities, electricity wholesaler, Energy News Network. The city of Norfolk, Nebraska, soon will celebrate its first solar farm — and the last one allowed under a contract with its electricity wholesaler.The 8.5-megawatt community solar project is being developed in partnership with the Nebraska Public Power District, which supplies power to most of the state outside of Omaha and Lincoln. The hitch for Norfolk is that the public utility’s contracts prevent municipal customers from generating more than 10% of their peak load from alternative sources, a threshold the city expects to reach with this project. “Northeast Nebraska is the renewable energy hotbed of the state,” said Norfolk Mayor Josh Moenning. “I’d much rather use clean energy that’s made in our backyard than haul it in on a coal train from Wyoming, which is the status quo in Nebraska.
  • NPPD’s Wholesale Power Contracts
    Wholesale energy sales are made to 60 entities under wholesale power contracts that terminate on Jan. 1, 2036 and to 10 other entities with wholesale power contracts that terminate on Dec. 31, 2021. The 10 wholesale customers that did not sign the 2016 contract provided the notice required under their existing 2002 contracts, and began in 2017 to reduce their purchases to 0% over a five-year period.  Source: Fitch Rates Nebraska Public Power District’s General Revs ‘A+’; Outlook Stable

Additional Resources

NPPD, OPPD, LES & MEAN Decarbonization Initiatives: A Brief Summary & Resources

NPPD’s Board of Directors is in the process of establishing Strategic Directive 5 (SD-05) regarding future decarbonization. The utility recently completed a series of forums to discuss decarbonization initiatives and gather public input.

OPPD has committed to achieving net-zero carbon power by 2050 and has initiated a “Pathways to Decarbonization” study to identify and prioritize strategies and actions to reach that goal. The utility has sponsored an ongoing series of public forums over the past several months, beginning in April. Click here to view recordings of all past workshops. A summary video of the workshops is also available here.

LES has the goal of achieving net-zero carbon production by 2040. “From 2010 – 2020 the utility reduced its carbon dioxide emissions by 53% and the carbon intensity of the energy produced by 45%”. Click here to learn more.

Additional Recommended Reading

MEAN’s Board of Directors approved a resolution in January 2020 to become a carbon-neutral power resource by 2050. Read the news release here and the resolution here.

About MEAN
The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska is the not-for-profit wholesale electricity supply organization of NMPP Energy. Created in 1981, MEAN provides cost-based power supply, transmission and related services to 69 participating communities in four states: Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska and Wyoming. MEAN Members/Participants

Nebraska
Alliance, Ansley, Arnold, Bayard, Beaver City, Benkelman, Blue Hill, Bridgeport, Broken Bow, Burwell, Callaway, Chappell, Crete, Curtis, Fairbury, Falls City, Gering, Grand Island, Grant, Hastings, Imperial, Kimball, Lyman, Mitchell, Morrill, Nebraska City, Neligh, Oxford, Paxton, Pender, Pierce, Plainview, Red Cloud, Scribner, Shickley, Sidney, Snyder, Spencer, Stuart, Trenton, West Point, Wisner

Banding Together: How Aggregation Helps Cities Buy Renewables At Scale

By Yuning Liu and Mia Reback, Rocky Mountain Institute

Aggregation can be a powerful way for cities to rapidly increase their renewable energy and help decarbonize local economies at the necessary speed and scale. Yet most cities have not pursued aggregation due to an inadequate understanding of its novel deal structure and a lack of tools and resources to help streamline the process. Read more here.

Access the Report: Procuring Large-Scale Renewables through Aggregation: A Guide for Local Governments

Example of aggregating small-scale solar projects into one Request for Proposals to save costs:


MEAN issues RFP For Participant Community Solar PV Installation Project

MEAN’s Renewable Energy Portfolio

STATE RPS UPDATES

State Renewable Portfolio Standards and Goals, National Conference of State Legislatures

Renewable energy policies help drive the nation’s $64 billion market for wind, solar and other renewable energy sources. These policies can play an integral role in state efforts to diversify their energy mix, promote economic development and reduce emissions. Roughly half of the growth in U.S. renewable energy generation since the beginning of the 2000s can be attributed to state renewable energy requirements.  

Previously Posted: Why the United States Needs A Clean Electricity Standard, Center for Climate And Energy Solutions

OPPD NEWS

Popular EV rebates back for another round, The Wire

If you’re in the market for an electric vehicle, here’s some good news: OPPD’s popular EV rebates program is back. Rebates are available toward the purchase of both a residential EV and charger, as well as for fleet vehicle replacement. The rebate program has proven popular and has sold out each year. Rebate funding was made available to OPPD as of July 1, 2021, and customers who purchase a new EV and charger after July 1 may be eligible.

OPPD’s New Guide to Electric Vehicles (EVs)

New Environment America Report – Blocking Rooftop Solar: The Companies, Lobbyists And Front Groups Undermining Local Clean Energy

Released by the Environment Florida Research & Policy Center

Recent corruption scandals in Ohio and Illinois, in which utilities and other special interests allegedly used their clout to twist public policy in their favor, highlight how far anti-solar efforts have gone. Policymakers must resist pressure from utilities and the fossil fuel industry and implement pro-solar policies that will continue America’s momentum toward clean energy

In 2021, a national network of utility interest groups and fossil fuel-linked think tanks continues to offer funding, advice and support to utilities across the country seeking to undermine rooftop solar power. These include . . .  Continue reading here.

Download Report (PDF)

IN NEBRASKA

Our State’s Overall Solar Development & Potential

Net Metering Legislative Bills

Net metering changes considered – Legislative Update, Senator John Cavanaugh
The Natural Resources Committee heard testimony Feb. 10, 2021 on two bills that would modify Nebraska’s net metering laws.

Approved Legislation: In 2016 the Nebraska Legislature passed LB 824, which removed some regulatory barriers connected to renewable energy development in our state.

NEBRASKA LACKS UPDATED ENERGY PLAN / CLIMATE ACTION PLAN 

State energy plans show how process can match final product in impact, Energy News Network, February 10, 2021

More Previous Efforts

    • Nebraska needs overall plan for energy policies, Lincoln Journal Star, November 4, 2015 Nebraska’s Energy Office director says the state needs a comprehensive approach to its energy policies as it faces what could be a “seismic” change in federal regulations governing emissions. David Bracht, Gov. Pete Ricketts’ chief adviser on energy issues, talked about state energy policies Wednesday at the eighth annual Nebraska Wind and Solar Conference in Omaha. . . . [The] Nebraska Legislature has instructed the state Energy Office to create a comprehensive energy plan and budgeted more than $630,000 to see it done.
    • LB469: Provide procedures and reporting requirements relating to a state plan on carbon dioxide emissions, require a strategic state energy plan, and provide requirements for meteorological evaluation towers.
    • 2011 Nebraska Energy Plan, National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO)

SOUTH SIOUX CITY

Nebraska solar farm highlights tension between cities, electricity wholesaler, Energy News Network, August 19, 2020

South Sioux City’s City Council decided four years ago not to renew its contract with NPPD. It has gradually reduced its purchases from the utility down to 10% of its load this year, and will stop buying power from the wholesaler altogether on Jan. 1, 2022. “We’ve been very happy with the decision the [city] council made to get more into renewables,” said Lance Hedquist, the city administrator of the community of about 13,000 also located in northeast Nebraska. The city has added solar and wind energy to its portfolio, and now obtains about half of its power from renewables, he said.

  • NPPD’s Wholesale Power Contracts
    Wholesale energy sales are made to 60 entities under wholesale power contracts that terminate on Jan. 1, 2036 and to 10 other entities with wholesale power contracts that terminate on Dec. 31, 2021. The 10 wholesale customers that did not sign the 2016 contract provided the notice required under their existing 2002 contracts, and began in 2017 to reduce their purchases to 0% over a five-year period.  Source: Fitch Rates Nebraska Public Power District’s General Revs ‘A+’; Outlook Stable

MODEL AGGREGATED SOLAR PROJECT – A WAY FOR COMMUNITIES TO REDUCE COSTS

MEAN Issues RFP For Participant Community Solar PV Installation Project, July 15, 2021
The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) is issuing a Request for Proposals on behalf of 11 MEAN participant communities interested in obtaining energy from solar PV installations to be built in their respective communities. The project is an effort by MEAN to bring economically priced solar energy to interested MEAN participant communities. Participating communities hope to obtain lower solar costs through economies of scale through this joint effort. RFP proposals are due Aug. 31, 2021 with a bid award date set for Oct. 27, 2021.

Click here to download the RFP.
Additional MEAN News

Previously Posted

About MEAN
The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) is the not-for-profit wholesale electricity supply organization of NMPP Energy. Created in 1981, MEAN provides cost-based power supply, transmission and related services to 69 participating communities in four states: Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska and Wyoming. MEAN Members/Participants

About NMPP Energy
NMPP Energy is a member-driven coalition of four organizations based in Lincoln, Neb., serving nearly 200 member communities in six Midwest and Rocky Mountain states. NMPP Energy’s organizations fulfill separate needs to their respective member communities. Collectively, they subscribe to the core philosophies of local control and working together to provide reliable, cost-based energy and energy-related services. NMPP Energy Members 

RECOMMENDED RESOURCE ON LEASING LAND FOR UTILITY-SCALE SOLAR

Considerations for Leasing Land for Solar Development, by F. John Hay – Extension Educator for Bioenergy

Utility scale solar development is here — in the eight months since the solar leasing article was published in August 2020, Nebraskans have seen continued land lease activity, county zoning rule adoption, an extension of the federal tax credit, and projects approved by county commissioners/supervisors. Additionally, one project (Saunders County [OPPD electrical purchase]) has reached the important step of electricity sales, which is the most common tipping point between a proposed project and a project that will get built. Many smaller solar projects have been built in the years prior to 2021, with the largest at about 8 MW, or about 50 acres. The utility scale projects being proposed and approved are many times larger, with 500 or more acres.

Western U.S. grid plan could remake renewables

By Edward Klump, E&E News

Bruce Rew, senior vice president of operations at SPP, said the expanded RTO footprint could utilize several grid connections that run from the Western Interconnection to the Eastern Interconnection. The connections are in Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska. Additional connections could be considered later. SPP’s bid to tie the nation’s main Eastern and Western grid networks together would be a first among existing RTOs. “I think it’s a very significant change in terms of how the electric grid is [operated] and what the potential benefits that closer operation between the Western Interconnection and Eastern Interconnection can provide,” Rew said. Read more here.

NEBRASKA ALSO IN THE NEWS HERE

GREEN HYDROGEN

Promoting energy innovation and U.S. jobs through a Green Hydrogen Production Tax Credit, Next Era Energy

To meet the U.S. national climate goal of cutting emissions 50% by 2030 compared to 2005 levels, as well as the Biden administration’s 2050 net-zero emissions goal, the U.S. will need to scale a range of new clean energy technologies. While proven technologies such as renewable generation and energy efficiency can drive a significant share of the greenhouse gas emission reductions necessary to achieve the U.S. climate target, new technologies are needed to address the remaining hard-to-decarbonize sectors that are important drivers of economic growth in the U.S., such as industry and heavy-duty transportation. Promoting U.S. innovation and competitiveness will require incentives to scale these emerging technologies. One such emerging technology is green hydrogen, which is well-placed to help the U.S. address a range of hard-to-decarbonize sectors.

ALSO OF POTENTIAL INTEREST

TIPS FOR SAVING ENERGY & MONEY PROVIDED BY OUR LARGEST UTILITIES

Growing Energy Markets: Southwest Power Pool Expands Day-Ahead Trading to the West

By Jeff St. John, Greentech Media

Interstate grid operator Southwest Power Pool has expanded its wholesale energy market, the latest step in a series of nationwide moves aimed at bringing more efficiency to parts of the country rich in renewable energy potential but lacking in the energy trading regimes to make the best use of it. Monday’s launch of SPP’s Western Energy Imbalance Service Market will bring real-time energy-balancing trading activity to eight utilities and transmission authorities across Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska. Read more here.

Also written by Jeff St. John and referenced in his current article:


The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) is among the participants in SPP’s Western Energy Imbalance Service Market.


About MEAN
The Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska (MEAN) is the not-for-profit wholesale electricity supply organization of NMPP Energy. Created in 1981, MEAN provides cost-based power supply, transmission and related services to 69 participating communities in four states: Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska and Wyoming.

MEAN Members/Participants

Additional Recommended Reading 


The Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association is also among  participants in SPP’s Western Energy Imbalance Service Market.


About Tri-State

Tri-State is a not-for-profit cooperative power supplier with 45 members, including 42 electric distribution cooperatives and public power districts in four states [Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico and Wyoming] that together provide power to more than a million electricity consumers across nearly 200,000 square miles of the West.

Additional Recommended Reading
Tri-State’s Responsible Energy Plan

Previously Posted
Tri-State takes significant step to increase member flexibility, sets contract termination payment methodology, Tri-State News Release. Under the new contract, utility members can self-supply up to 50% of their load requirements, subject to availability in the open season, in addition to the current 5% self-supply provisions and a new community solar provision. In late 2019, the board of directors approved the Contract Committee’s recommendation to expand member opportunities for community solar projects. 

Solar Industry Outlines a Policy Agenda for the Biden Administration, 117th Congress

SEIA News Release, November 12, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) is releasing a suite of policies and executive actions that it is asking President-elect Biden and the newly elected Congress to act on during their first 100 days in office.

“Our 100-day agenda aligns with President-elect Biden’s vision to build back better, and represents a critical opportunity to meet the moment of the climate era with equity and justice at the forefront,” said Abigail Ross Hopper, president and CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). “Even as we face a likely divided government, every facet of this agenda has had bipartisan support. Now is the time to take action to generate economic opportunities for Americans in a way that promotes competition and addresses the climate crisis.” Read more here.

GREEN BIZ 350 PODCAST

Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers, by Heather Clancy, Joel Makower & Jim Giles

TRANSMISSION

Transmission troubles? A solution could be lying along rail lines and next generation highways, Utility Dive. Recent studies, including the landmark and reportedly suppressed Department of Energy Seam study, show expanded transmission is critical. But two key barriers — where to put the new lines and how to pay for them — still slow development, according to a June 2020 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission report to Congress. Allocation of the new lines’ costs remains unresolved, but new approaches to siting are attracting attention.

TRI-STATE

Tri-State ups the amount of greenhouse gases it will cut in Colorado by adding wind and solar generation, The Colorado Sun. Colorado’s second biggest electricity provider – Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association – upped its goal for reducing its greenhouse gas emissions to an 80% cut by 2030 – putting itself in line with other utilities in the state. Tri-State is joining with North Dakota-based Basin Electric Power Cooperative, the Deseret Power Cooperative in Utah, the Municipal Energy Agency of Nebraska and the federal Western Area Power Administration to explore joining the Southwest Power Pool (SPP).

Tri-State is a nonprofit cooperative of 45 members, including 42 electric distribution cooperatives and public power districts in four states: Nebraska, Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming. Together, they provide power to more than a million electricity consumers.

CROWDFUNDED TRIBAL SOLAR 

Crowdfunded solar puts Red Lake Nation on a path to energy sovereignty, by Frank Jossi, Energy News Network

“We have to prove that we can do this and we have to do this not only for ourselves but for other tribal nations,” said Red Lake member Bob Blake, the founder and owner of Solar Bear installation company. The workforce training center solar array is the second of 12 solar projects planned for the reservation. The first sits not far away atop the Red Lake Government Center, a building distinguished by incorporating a two-story face of an eagle with wings spread across the facade. The projects are the first two solar installations in Minnesota to be financed through crowdfunding, in which dozens of small investors lend to businesses to support entrepreneurs and their products. The tribe has a separate initiative to construct a utility-scale 13-megawatt solar farm in partnership with Allete, one of the region’s primary electricity providers.

GEOTHERMAL

The Earth itself could provide carbon-free heat for buildings, by David Roberts, Vox
What exactly are the technologies that can provide heat from the Earth? There are two basic categories. Let’s start by looking at the smaller side.

NEBRASKA’S FIRST ALL-GEOTHERMAL NEIGHBORHOOD

The Bridges is a unique neighborhood being developed in Lincoln, Nebraska of lakefront lots and traditional lots. Geothermal energy is featured throughout the entire development, which is landscaped with miles of trails and covered bridges. Download a brochure.

GAS BANS GROWING IN CALIFORNIA

San Francisco’s gas ban on new buildings could prompt statewide action, Utility Dive
The vote adds San Francisco to the growing list of nearly 40 California cities to pass such ordinances since Berkeley’s historic ban in July 2019.

FINANCIAL RISKS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

In first for Fed, U.S. central bank says climate poses stability risks, Reuters
The U.S. Federal Reserve for the first time called out climate change among risks enumerated in its biannual financial stability report, and warned about the potential for abrupt changes in asset values in response to a warming planet. “Acute hazards, such as storms, floods, or wildfires, may cause investors to update their perceptions of the value of real or financial assets suddenly,” Fed Governor Lael Brainard said in comments attached to the report, released Monday.

EV CHARGING STATIONS 

NREL report says EV charging stations continued strong growth in early 2020, American Public Power Association

The report’s statistics tap data from the Alternative Fueling Station Locator, which NREL said is the most widely used tool on the Department of Energy’s Alternative Fuels Data Center. The report is available here.

EV REBATES