Tag Archives: MidAmerican Energy

New Project Would More Than Double Wisconsin’s Solar Energy Output

By Hope Kirwin, Wisconsin Public Radio

A major utility in western Wisconsin has announced plans for a new solar farm in Jefferson
County. Dairyland Power Cooperative plans to purchase 149 megawatts of solar energy from the Badger State Solar project. That’s almost six times Dairyland’s current solar investment and
would more than double the state’s solar production, The new partnership would create one of the largest solar farms in Wisconsin. The solar farm would be built by development company
Ranger Power on private land in the towns of Jefferson and Oakland. Read more here.

Ranger Power Photo

Related

MORE NEWS FROM STATES


Big cheese gets big solar+storage proposal, PV Magazine
Invenergy has proposed a solar project up to 200 MWac / 300 MWdc in capacity with a 50 MW / 200 MWh battery in Kenosha County, Wisconsin.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

State of the states: 4 reasons that red plus blue makes green economics, Utility Dive Contributor Malcolm D. Woolf, managing director of MW Energy Advisors and former chair of the National Association of State Energy Officials.

Washington, D.C. is abuzz with the Green New Deal, but my bet is that the most pivotal energy legislation enacted this year comes from red and blue state houses across the nation.

GLOBAL NEWS

Rise of bifacial lifts profits for the world’s tracker companies, PV Magazine

Soltec Image: Single-axis tracker

Omaha utility’s carbon intensity goal obscures ongoing fossil fuel use

Written by Karen Uhlenhuth, Midwest Energy News

The carbon intensity goal passed on a 6-2 vote. The goal could change if the board revisits the issue after January, when newly elected board members — including three clean energy supporters — are seated. A debate about carbon intensity also surfaced recently in Iowa, where
MidAmerican Energy won regulatory approval last week for a 591-megawatt wind farm known as Wind XII. In its application, the utility’s president and CEO, Adam Wright, noted that the project would lower the utility’s carbon intensity to about 638 pounds per net megawatt-hour, compared to 1,839 pounds per megawatt 15 years ago, before it began investing in wind energy. “The carbon intensity, even if it’s calculated correctly, doesn’t mean they’ve reduced their emissions that much,” said Paul Chernick, an attorney representing the Sierra Club in the case.
Read the entire article here.

Pat Hawks / Flickr / Creative Commons Image

Related News Stories

CARBON CAPTURE RESEARCH
DOE spent more than $500M on dead projects, E&E News
Nearly half the $2.7 billion in fossil research money spent by the Department of Energy over the last seven years supported nine carbon capture demonstration projects, the majority of which were canceled or withdrawn.

Four key takeaways from a Michigan utility’s clean energy transition

By Andy Balaskovitz, Midwest Energy News

In a speech this week to a large, business-friendly crowd in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Consumers Energy President and CEO Patti Poppe presented an economic case for solar power, electric vehicles and moving past coal. The company closed seven Michigan coal plants in 2016, cutting carbon emissions 25 percent without hurting its workforce. As the company focuses on solar in the coming years, Poppe said electric vehicles will play a growing role in the company’s “triple bottom line” principle of serving people, the planet and prosperity. Read more here.

Photo: Consumers Energy’s community solar array at Grand Valley State University.

MORE CLEAN ENERGY TRANSITION NEWS

EIA says 4 GW of coal-fired capacity may retire by end of 2019, American Public Power Association. So far in 2018, 11 GW of coal-fired generating capacity has retired through September, and another 3 GW are expected to retire in the final three months of the year, based on data reported to EIA by plant owners and operators. “If these plants retire as planned, 2018 will be the second-highest year for coal retirements. Another 4 GW of capacity are planning to retire by the end of 2019,” EIA reported.

U.S. energy storage storm grows in strength, PV Magazine

A Wood Mackenzie report shows U.S. energy storage deployments tripling in capacity during Q3 ’18 versus last year’s volume, while noting that the future pipeline growth rate doubled versus prior quarters to reach a 33 GW of future projects.


NEWS FROM OTHER STATES

EV NEWS

 

New plans by VW, Tesla and BYD support predictions that EV sales are set to skyrocket, PV Magazine

 

 

Major Study Shows Electric Bikes Good For Health, CleanTechnica
There was moderate evidence that e-cycling provided physical activity of at least moderate intensity, which was lower than the intensity elicited during conventional cycling, but higher than that during walking. There was also moderate evidence that e-cycling can improve cardiorespiratory fitness in physically inactive individuals. Photo: Omaha QuikByke Kiosk

ENERGY CONSERVATION

 

Rule your attic, save on energy costs, The Wire, OPPD Blog

Trump order on coal, nuclear power could force Nebraska, Iowa utilities to raise rates

By Aaron Sanderford, Omaha World-Herald

Many utilities, including local ones, have committed millions of dollars to wind and solar projects, signing contracts with significant penalties if broken. Utilities also belong to regional groupings that require certain levels of production. “The bottom line of what it would do is increase our prices,” said Anne McGuire, vice chair of the Omaha Public Power District board. “We would have to increase our rates, which we wouldn’t be too happy about.” The president on June 1 ordered Energy Secretary Rick Perry to take “immediate steps” to boost struggling coal and nuclear plants. Read the entire article here.

Omaha World-Herald print title: Utilities wary of possible requirement to use more coal, nuclear power

Photo Courtesy of Lincoln Electric System: OPPD is planning to build a solar array near Fort Calhoun similar in size to Lincoln Electric System’s SunShares 5-megawatt Solar Farm.

RELATED READING

ALSO OF POTENTIAL INTEREST

With more solar and wind, North America’s grid is getting more reliable

Seven U.S. cities to power municipal operations with renewables

In this op-ed for pv magazine, Will Driscoll outlines the plans of several large U.S. cities
to power government buildings entirely with renewable energy.

Chicago, which has committed to power its 900 municipal buildings with 100 percent renewable electricity by 2025, has joined a seven-city collaboration to request price estimates for renewable electricity. The collaboration, led by Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, also includes Los Angeles, Houston, Portland, OR, Orlando, FL, and Evanston, IL. The cities expect to issue a single request for information (RFI) to renewable developers later this summer. Mayor Walsh, who co-chairs the Climate Mayors network of more than 400 cities, has invited other cities to join in the RFI by submitting their “energy demand data.”  Click here to read more.

Climate Mayors Website

Will Driscoll, MPA, JD, is an energy and environmental policy analyst who has worked primarily for the U.S. EPA via the contractor ICF Consulting. His recent work is at SaveTheClimate.us.

MORE U.S. NEWS

GLOBAL NEWS

Is India’s 225 GW renewables target achievable?

Utilities, Municipalities Are Warming Up To Solar Power

Written by Scott Wiater, President and CEO of Maryland-based Standard Solar Posted by Solar Industry Magazine

Although some of the biggest utilities outside of California are still struggling to deal with integrating solar into their portfolios, there are many utilities that get it. Some are large – Duke Energy and Dominion Energy, to name but two. Some are small, such as the Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) in Florida and River Falls, Wis., Municipal Utilities. Read more here.

Photo by Erik Christensen, Flickr

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

Vestas scores massive order for Warren Buffett-backed wind farm

Vestas Wind TurbinesThe buyer is MidAmerican Energy, a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway Energy based in Des Moines and serving over 750,000 customers in Iowa, Illinois, South Dakota and Nebraska.

By Cathy Proctor, Denver Business Journal

Vestas Wind Systems, with four manufacturing plants in Colorado, has reached a conditional agreement to supply up to 1,000 wind turbines to a massive wind farm in Iowa.

It’s the largest order ever for a U.S. wind farm and believed to be one of the largest orders in the world, according to industry experts. Continue reading.

New MidAmerican time-lapse video shows construction of tallest wind turbine in the U.S.

midamerican-tallest-wind-tower

MidAmerican Energy recently released a six-minute video, “Reaching New Heights,” which uses a combination of time-lapse footage, aerial photography and behind-the-scenes action shots to document the steps involved in building the company’s first concrete wind turbine tower. It’s located at MidAmerican’s Adams wind farm in Adams County, Iowa. At 379 feet from ground to hub, the concrete turbine is more than 100 feet taller than its neighboring turbines constructed with steel towers. Click the image above to view the video. 

Opinion: Power of wind continues to blow across Iowa

Sioux City JournalSioux City Journal
As we have said before, the wind industry is, from any perspective, a winner for our state. In addition to creating jobs (according to Durham, wind energy supports 7,000 of them), it helps keep electric rates stable for utility customers, puts more money in the pockets of farmers and other rural landowners in the form of lease payments, creates export potential and increases property tax revenue. Read the entire opinion here.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
MidAmerican News Release: MidAmerican Energy announces $3.6 billion investment in renewable energy. MidAmerican Energy completed its first wind farm in 2004. Since then, the energy company has built 3,450 megawatts of wind energy. The company has invested $6.6 billion over the last 12 years building wind projects in Iowa; with the construction of Wind XI, that figure will climb to more than $10 billion in overall wind investment, all with minimal impact to customer costs.
Iowa leads the nation in wind power production, by Jeremy Dillon, Congressional Quarterly. Posted on LaCrosse Tribune.ComWASHINGTON (TNS) — Champions of clean energy often look to California and other blue states for leadership on green issues, but lately the state that is the king of wind power is a decidedly red one in the heart of Middle America. To be sure, Iowa’s success with wind was helped in no small part by its geography. Part of the infamous Tornado Alley, Iowa’s flat topography enables better and more frequent wind gusts. “The plains are where wind blows the best,” says Radha Adhar, a lobbyist for the Sierra Club.
Wind industry touts consumer savings, landowner income,  by Jonathan H. Harsch, Agri-Pulse Communications, Inc.
Declining prices, stable outlook drive utilities, large companies to wind power, by Herman K. Trabish, Utility Dive
How to create electricity from thin air, by Greg Alvarez, American Wind Energy Association Blog
How Wind Turbines Work – Animated Infographic. (Click image to enlarge it).  

MidAmerican Energy completes wind farms

A view of MidAmerican Energy’s Vienna wind project in Tama and Marshall counties from atop the nacelle of one of the wind turbines. MidAmerican Energy photo.

A view of MidAmerican Energy’s Vienna wind project in Tama and Marshall counties from atop the nacelle of one of the wind turbines. MidAmerican Energy photo.

By George C. Ford, The Gazette

MidAmerican Energy on Wednesday said it has completed two major wind energy installations in Iowa, adding more than 1,200 megawatts of electric generation.

The Highland wind farm in O’Brien County, which began providing electricity on Dec. 3, 2015, is the fifth and final piece of MidAmerican Energy’s Wind VIII project — the Des Moines utility’s largest wind energy project to date.

Continue reading.