Tag Archives: Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Study: We can meet the Paris Climate targets for 1/3 the cost of CURRENT fossil fuel subsidies!

By Karel Beckman, Red, Green and Blue

The Leonardo DeCaprio Foundation has a new study out that shows it would take approximately $1.7 trillion per year globally to meet the Paris Climate goals and avoid climate change disaster. [Director of Innovation at the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation] Karl Burkart notes that this amount “pales in comparison to the vast subsidies governments currently provide to prop up the ailing fossil fuel industry, estimated at more than $5 trillion per year by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Taxpayers are unwittingly funding the climate crisis, and that needs to stop.” Read more here.

MORE CLIMATE NEWS

SEIA NEWS RELEASE


Solar is the Future of American Energy

Declaring the 2020s the Solar Energy Decade, SEIA’s President & CEO Abby Hopper made a mark at the United States Energy Association’s 15th Annual State of the Energy Industry Forum.

 

CORPORATE RENEWABLE ENERGY NEWS


Corporations’ Hunger for Clean Power Has Never Been Bigger, Bloomberg. Facebook is now the largest corporate buyer of clean power. Image: Facebook Data Center under construction in Papillion

 

ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

America’s Energy Future: What the Government Misses in Its Long-Term Outlook and Why It Matters, Inside Climate News
The U.S. government’s new long-term energy outlook paints a picture of the future that few utilities and energy analysts actually expect to see. It underplays how rapidly coal will retreat from the market and fails to grasp the scale of growth for renewable energy compared to utilities’ plans and analysts’ expectations.

From the editor: EIA versus the future, by Christian Roselund, PV Magazine
EIA’s short-term forecasts have been generally thoughtful and informative. But when we start to look beyond a few years, EIA’s projections start to lose their credibility, and the assumptions that they make become increasingly problematic.

GREEN NEW DEAL

Economic Reasons For The Green New Deal — The Numbers Speak For Themselves, by Carolyn Fortuna, CleanTechnica. I’ve been participating in Sunrise Movement trainings to raise awareness of the Green New Deal and to motivate Congress to take significant action
toward 100% US renewable energy within the decade. Surrounded by a mass of college kids with a spattering of we older folks, I’ve been immersed in strategizing so that we can more effectively fight at the local and national levels to make the Green New Deal a reality.

A 3-part theory of change that mobilizes millions, elects a critical mass of supportive public officials, and builds a new peoples’ alignment that advances a shared agenda for society is underway here, folks. And, should you have questions about whether a bunch of kids and an idealistic vision to restructure the way energy is done in the US is practical, just look at the numbers. More than anything, there are significant economic reasons to implement a Green New Deal.

Four key takeaways from a Michigan utility’s clean energy transition

By Andy Balaskovitz, Midwest Energy News

In a speech this week to a large, business-friendly crowd in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Consumers Energy President and CEO Patti Poppe presented an economic case for solar power, electric vehicles and moving past coal. The company closed seven Michigan coal plants in 2016, cutting carbon emissions 25 percent without hurting its workforce. As the company focuses on solar in the coming years, Poppe said electric vehicles will play a growing role in the company’s “triple bottom line” principle of serving people, the planet and prosperity. Read more here.

Photo: Consumers Energy’s community solar array at Grand Valley State University.

MORE CLEAN ENERGY TRANSITION NEWS

EIA says 4 GW of coal-fired capacity may retire by end of 2019, American Public Power Association. So far in 2018, 11 GW of coal-fired generating capacity has retired through September, and another 3 GW are expected to retire in the final three months of the year, based on data reported to EIA by plant owners and operators. “If these plants retire as planned, 2018 will be the second-highest year for coal retirements. Another 4 GW of capacity are planning to retire by the end of 2019,” EIA reported.

U.S. energy storage storm grows in strength, PV Magazine

A Wood Mackenzie report shows U.S. energy storage deployments tripling in capacity during Q3 ’18 versus last year’s volume, while noting that the future pipeline growth rate doubled versus prior quarters to reach a 33 GW of future projects.


NEWS FROM OTHER STATES

EV NEWS

 

New plans by VW, Tesla and BYD support predictions that EV sales are set to skyrocket, PV Magazine

 

 

Major Study Shows Electric Bikes Good For Health, CleanTechnica
There was moderate evidence that e-cycling provided physical activity of at least moderate intensity, which was lower than the intensity elicited during conventional cycling, but higher than that during walking. There was also moderate evidence that e-cycling can improve cardiorespiratory fitness in physically inactive individuals. Photo: Omaha QuikByke Kiosk

ENERGY CONSERVATION

 

Rule your attic, save on energy costs, The Wire, OPPD Blog

New EIA report shows wind pulls its weight

By Curtis Walter, Into the Wind, AWEA Blog

new report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) found that wind and solar generated over 20 percent of the total electricity in 10 states last year. This offers yet another data point that renewables like wind power have become an important part of America’s electricity mix. The 10 states include Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, South Dakota, North Dakota, Vermont, California, Maine, Colorado, and Minnesota. Together, they represent a diverse sample of Lower 48 states running on more affordable, reliable, clean energy than ever before.
Continue reading here,

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

Microsoft, Walmart, Iron Mountain: The corporate buyer parade continues

EIA: Expanding energy policies would spur renewables, efficiency

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By Robert Walton, Utility Dive

Extending tax credits for renewable energy, efficiency standards for appliances and vehicles, and making the Clean Power Plan more aggressive past 2030, would reduce carbon dioxide emissions from energy sources and boost renewable production, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Solar and wind generation could grow to 1,236 billion kWh in 2040, 30% above a projected 950 billion kWh in the current reference case if tax credits are kept in place. Click to continue reading.

Photo: Blakeman Ranch’s 650-kilowatt solar array in Custer County, Nebraska. Credit: Innovative Solar LLC

MORE NEWS
Texas on Track to Become the Fastest-Growing Utility-Scale Solar Market in the U.S., Solar Energy Industries Association. WASHINGTON, D.C. – Kicking off the year with record growth across all solar sectors, Texas is on track to become the fastest-growing utility-scale solar market in the U.S. within the next five years, according to the recently released U.S. Solar Market Insight, Q2 2016, compiled by GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) . . . Of the 4,600 MW projected to come online in Texas by 2020, 4,000 MW will be utility-scale. Read more here.

Solar power crosses threshold, gets cheaper than natural gas

By David Ferris, Environment & Energy (E&E) Reporter

PV Magazine photo of a 50-MW solar plant

PV Magazine photo of a 50-MW solar plant

Excerpt
Last month, NV Energy Inc., the principal utility for the state of Nevada, owned by billionaire investor Warren Buffett, signed a deal with solar developer SunPower Corp. for a 100 MW plant at a price of 4.6 cents per kilowatt-hour. Also last month, NV Energy fixed a price with First Solar Inc. for 3.87 cents per kWh from a 100 MW plant that could be the cheapest electricity in the United States according to PV Magazine . . . Also, in May, Austin Energy in Texas signed a 20-year, 150-MW deal with Recurrent Energy for 5 cents per kWh, Utility Dive reported. As recently as 2014, solar power plants were costing nearly 14 cents per kWh, according to PV Magazine. By comparison, the benchmark 2014 price of electricity from an advanced combined-cycle natural gas plant was 6.4 cents per kWh, according to data from the Energy Information Administration.

Read more here.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
Next Texas Energy Boom: Solar, by Russell Gold, The Wall Street Journal
Excerpt: A new energy boom is taking shape in the oil fields of west Texas, but it’s not what you think. It’s solar. Solar power has gotten so cheap to produce—and so competitively priced in the electricity market—that it is taking hold even in a state that, unlike California, doesn’t offer incentives to utilities to buy or build sun-powered generation.

Federal USDA grants help ag green up

By Josephine Chang-Olenick, Gering Citizen, the only independently owned newspaper in the Twin Cities of Gering and Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

The federal Rural Energy for America Program makes it possible for agricultural producers to install solar panels such as these on their farms and ranches.

Photo: USDA/Gering Citizen

Photo: USDA/Gering Citizen

Rural farms and ranches can be the most susceptible to the adverse effects of rising energy costs that are affecting not only Nebraskans, but agricultural producers nation and world-wide.

According to the EIA, the United States Energy Information Administration, energy consumption for the United States alone has dramatically increased within the last year due to population and economic growth. The Nebraska Energy Office statistics for energy consumption in Nebraska’s industrial sector also reflects a rise in energy consumption, including a 24.5 percent increase in petroleum use. These increases in energy cost and consumption translate into high operational and maintenance costs for farm and ranch owners dependent on powered machinery and equipment necessary for their specific businesses.

Click here to read the rest of the story.