Tag Archives: climate change

New state science standards, which include climate change, are approved

By Joe Dejka, Omaha World-Herald

LINCOLN — After months of public debate, the Nebraska State Board of Education approved new state science standards Friday. The board voted 6-1 to approve the standards, which will introduce climate change in Nebraska high school science classes for the first time. Read more.

U.S. Power Plant Emissions Fall to Near 1990 Levels, Decoupling from GDP Growth

By Georgina Gustin, Inside Climate News

The economy is growing as carbon dioxide emissions fall and renewable energy rises. A new report examines the carbon footprint of the top electricity generators.
Continue reading.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

Even in Nebraska, which hasn’t shied away from coal, other energy sources are gaining use

By Cole Epley, Omaha World-Herald

President Donald Trump’s removal of the United States from the Paris Agreement climate plan won’t provide a lifeline to the ailing coal industry — even in a state like Nebraska that burns a lot of it. Utilities, railroads and other users and haulers of the black stuff say that when it comes to the move away from coal, the train has already left the station.

Continue reading.

Photo: A Union Pacific train carries coal through North Platte, Nebraska. The coal industry has seen growing competition from natural gas, wind and solar power.
Credit: Rebecca S. Gratz / The World-Herald

City council explores possibility of solar power, joining Nebraska Community Energy Alliance

By Austin Koeller, Grand Island Independent

The City of Grand Island and the Utilities Department may begin using solar panel in the near future. Utilities Director Tim Luchsinger gave a presentation to the city council as part of a study session Tuesday night, Luchsinger told the council that in the late 1990s, the Utilities Department began exploring wind power and became a minority partner in various wind projects. He added solar power may be the future and the Utilities Department would like to explore its possibility as a renewable energy resource. The Utilities Department plans to potentially do a small, pilot solar project at a site near JBS at the corner of Swift Road and Museum Drive. It would be a one-megawatt project that would provide power to 180 homes on an annual basis. Continue reading.

Nebraska Community Energy Alliance 

Photo of Downtown Grand Island by Joe Wicks

MORE NEBRASKA / MIDWEST NEWS

NATIONAL NEWS

GLOBAL NEWS
Solar Energy Market Expected to Reach $422 Billion, Globally, by 2022 – Allied Market Research,
PR Newswire

Calling for commitment to renewable energy

By Nick Gebhart, North Platte Bulletin 

Nebraska State Capitol

Sens. Ken Haar of Malcolm and Tyson Larson of O’Neill heard testimony Wednesday from leaders from around the state calling for a response to the growing threat of climate change and an increase in energy from renewable resources . . . A group of students and faculty from Omaha North High School were at the hearing and a student, Gabriel Runyon, testified. Runyon said committing to renewable resources and stopping the effects of climate change were important to his generation. Haar thanked him for testifying, and said that more young people should speak out, because elected officials would listen. Read more.

Ten Things More Important than the Clean Power Plan in Limiting Carbon Emissions in the U.S.

RMI


Here are ten policies, trends, and market forces that are having a larger substantive impact on the trajectory of CO₂ emissions in the U.S. than the Clean Power Plan will.

1. MERCURY AND AIR TOXIC STANDARDS
2. INVESTMENT TAX CREDIT EXTENSION FOR SOLAR PV AND PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT EXTENSION FOR WIND
3. SUPREME COURT RULING ON FERC 745 (DEMAND RESPONSE)
4. ECONOMICS OF COAL, GAS, AND RENEWABLES
5. LEADING UTILITIES
6. INDUSTRY LEADERS
7. LEADING STATE LEGISLATIVE POLICIES
8. LEADING STATE REGULATORY POLICIES
9. PROGRESSIVE INDEPENDENT SYSTEM OPERATORS
10. CUSTOMER CHOICE

Click here to read about each one.

Senator works to protect the earth

By Don Walton, Lincoln Journal Star

Senator Ken Haar
With time running out on his days as a state senator, Ken Haar of Malcolm has presented the 2016 Legislature with a clean energy agenda and is preparing to rally young Nebraskans to protect their future.

“There is an urgency” now as the world accepts the reality of climate change, Haar said during an interview in his Capitol office. “There is so much to do.”

Continue reading.

The public is invited: Reverend Lennox Yearwood of the Hip Hop Caucus will deliver the Keynote Address for the Nebraska Youth Summit on Climate this Wednesday, January 27th at 7 p.m. in UNL’s Nebraska Union, 14th & R. Click here for more information.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
Senator Ken Haar Introduces LB1071 – The Solar Energy Economic Development Act & Additional Energy-Related Bills

Creighton University’s Thursday Screening of the Documentary: “This Changes Everything”

Click image to view trailer.

Click image to view trailer.

Creighton University invites the public to a screening of the film, This Changes Everything, on Thursday, November 19th from 7 to 9 PM in the Harper Center, Room 3028. The documentary’s theme surrounds the concepts that are intertwined into the paradigm of climate change, the necessity of clean energy strategies, with a focus on current economic models.

Creighton University’s Energy Science Club will have a brief introductory session, followed by the 90-minute screening and an approximately 20-minute panel presentation by Creighton students and faculty.

Sponsored by the Creighton University Committee on Lectures, Films and Concerts & Creighton’s Energy Science Club. For more information, please contact: GunnarNelson@Creighton.Edu

New York Times Review of Naomi Klein’s book, This Changes Everything

Google Map of the Harper Center

Rural Nebraska Poll shows changing attitudes on climate change

Rural Nebraska Poll

By Chris Dunker, Lincoln Journal Star

Excerpt
A majority of rural Nebraskans believe the state should start adapting to a changing climate, according to a survey conducted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln this year. Sixty-one percent of the more than 2,200 respondents to the Nebraska Rural Poll said the state should begin preparing for climate change in order to reduce its impact on agriculture, rural communities, forestry and natural resources . . . Eight in 10 respondents said Nebraska should do more to build the state’s solar or wind energy production, while roughly 60 percent agreed resources like ethanol or biodiesel should be explored in greater depth.

Nebraska Rural Poll

Photo Credit: Richard Piersol / Lincoln Journal Star. This file photo from 2012 shows a drought-stricken ear of corn near Fremont.

Read the entire story here.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
Nebraskans call for state action on climate change, by Nancy Gaarder, World-Herald Staff Writer