Tag Archives: climate change

Commentary: To fight climate change, we must change our vocabulary

By Dick Munson, Director of Midwest clean energy for the Environmental Defense Fund, Guest Opinion, Midwest Energy News

Each fall, Chicago throws a Humanities Festival to promote “the lifelong exploration of what it means to be human,” attracting thoughtful authors and expressive performers. Two lectures on a recent Saturday afternoon provided fresh perspectives on how environmentalists combat pollution and envision a healthier planet.

For me, those discussions revealed how we can tap different threads — specifically faith and literature — to make our cases more effectively.

Read more here.

 

ALSO OF POTENTIAL INTEREST

‘Landmark’ decision casts youth as official intervenors in pipeline case

By Frank Jossi, Midwest Energy News

It’s rare to see millennials attending a PUC hearing, or even someone not on the payroll of an organization involved in the process. But administrative law judge Ann O’Reilly accepted the argument by Youth Climate Intervenors that their generation will disproportionately feel the burden of climate change.

“In a landmark decision she granted us standing,” said Akilah Sanders-Reed, the 23-year-old who founded the group. “She acknowledged we (young people) had a stake in it and that we deserved a seat at the table. What that means is that the Youth Climate Intervenors have the same rights in that courtroom as Enbridge Energy does.” Read more here.

ALSO IN THE NEWS

This Pathway is the Best Opportunity for Corporate Utility-scale Solar PV Procurement

By Jennifer Deloney, Associate Editor, Renewable Energy World

A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) said that innovation is enabling more corporate solar procurement, with new purchasing models, declining costs, and increased interest by corporate purchasers driving this segment.

NREL said that as of July, corporate customers have contracted for more than 2,300 MW of utility-scale solar PV. In addition, corporate procurement of utility-scale solar PV grew from about 1 percent of annual installed utility scale capacity in 2014 to 9 percent in 2016, and it accounted for 17 percent so far this year. Click here to learn more. 

ALSO OF POTENTIAL INTEREST

New state science standards, which include climate change, are approved

By Joe Dejka, Omaha World-Herald

LINCOLN — After months of public debate, the Nebraska State Board of Education approved new state science standards Friday. The board voted 6-1 to approve the standards, which will introduce climate change in Nebraska high school science classes for the first time. Read more.

U.S. Power Plant Emissions Fall to Near 1990 Levels, Decoupling from GDP Growth

By Georgina Gustin, Inside Climate News

The economy is growing as carbon dioxide emissions fall and renewable energy rises. A new report examines the carbon footprint of the top electricity generators.
Continue reading.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

Even in Nebraska, which hasn’t shied away from coal, other energy sources are gaining use

By Cole Epley, Omaha World-Herald

President Donald Trump’s removal of the United States from the Paris Agreement climate plan won’t provide a lifeline to the ailing coal industry — even in a state like Nebraska that burns a lot of it. Utilities, railroads and other users and haulers of the black stuff say that when it comes to the move away from coal, the train has already left the station.

Continue reading.

Photo: A Union Pacific train carries coal through North Platte, Nebraska. The coal industry has seen growing competition from natural gas, wind and solar power.
Credit: Rebecca S. Gratz / The World-Herald

City council explores possibility of solar power, joining Nebraska Community Energy Alliance

By Austin Koeller, Grand Island Independent

The City of Grand Island and the Utilities Department may begin using solar panel in the near future. Utilities Director Tim Luchsinger gave a presentation to the city council as part of a study session Tuesday night, Luchsinger told the council that in the late 1990s, the Utilities Department began exploring wind power and became a minority partner in various wind projects. He added solar power may be the future and the Utilities Department would like to explore its possibility as a renewable energy resource. The Utilities Department plans to potentially do a small, pilot solar project at a site near JBS at the corner of Swift Road and Museum Drive. It would be a one-megawatt project that would provide power to 180 homes on an annual basis. Continue reading.

Nebraska Community Energy Alliance 

Photo of Downtown Grand Island by Joe Wicks

MORE NEBRASKA / MIDWEST NEWS

NATIONAL NEWS

GLOBAL NEWS
Solar Energy Market Expected to Reach $422 Billion, Globally, by 2022 – Allied Market Research,
PR Newswire

Calling for commitment to renewable energy

By Nick Gebhart, North Platte Bulletin 

Nebraska State Capitol

Sens. Ken Haar of Malcolm and Tyson Larson of O’Neill heard testimony Wednesday from leaders from around the state calling for a response to the growing threat of climate change and an increase in energy from renewable resources . . . A group of students and faculty from Omaha North High School were at the hearing and a student, Gabriel Runyon, testified. Runyon said committing to renewable resources and stopping the effects of climate change were important to his generation. Haar thanked him for testifying, and said that more young people should speak out, because elected officials would listen. Read more.

Ten Things More Important than the Clean Power Plan in Limiting Carbon Emissions in the U.S.

RMI


Here are ten policies, trends, and market forces that are having a larger substantive impact on the trajectory of CO₂ emissions in the U.S. than the Clean Power Plan will.

1. MERCURY AND AIR TOXIC STANDARDS
2. INVESTMENT TAX CREDIT EXTENSION FOR SOLAR PV AND PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT EXTENSION FOR WIND
3. SUPREME COURT RULING ON FERC 745 (DEMAND RESPONSE)
4. ECONOMICS OF COAL, GAS, AND RENEWABLES
5. LEADING UTILITIES
6. INDUSTRY LEADERS
7. LEADING STATE LEGISLATIVE POLICIES
8. LEADING STATE REGULATORY POLICIES
9. PROGRESSIVE INDEPENDENT SYSTEM OPERATORS
10. CUSTOMER CHOICE

Click here to read about each one.