Tag Archives: City of Grand Island

Valmont uses proprietary trackers in 1-MW solar project supporting its manufacturing facility

By Billy Ludt, Solar Power World

Valmont Industries, a global provider of engineered products and services for infrastructure development and irrigation equipment and services for agriculture, celebrated the interconnection of its 1-MW solar field at its manufacturing facility in Valley, Nebraska. The new solar array is the largest privately-owned, behind-the-meter solar field in Nebraska, spanning 4.3 acres. Convert, a Valmont company, supplied 45 tracker tables making the array. Continue reading here.

Links to additional information:

Photo by Valmont – Project installer: Interconnection Systems Inc based in Central City, Nebraska.

GRAND ISLAND NEWS

Grand Island looks to sell surplus credits from green energy, by Brandon Summers, Grand Island Independent

“We’ve been approached by some companies that are interested in marketing these renewable energy credits to either utilities that are in states that have these mandates for renewable energy credits, or companies out there that are interested in reducing their carbon footprint,” Utilities Director Tim Luchsinger said. In 2015, the city launched its first wind project, and a solar array pilot project in 2018. A 50-megawatt wind project in Custer County will go online in two to three years. “That will increase our renewable energy to about 45% to 50% of our total energy used,” Luchsinger said.

Recommended Resources

Previously posted articles by Karen Uhlenhuth, Energy News Network:

  • Nebraska solar farm highlights tension between cities, electricity wholesaler
    The city of Norfolk, Nebraska, soon will celebrate its first solar farm — and the last one allowed under a contract with its electricity wholesaler. The 8.5-megawatt community solar project is being developed in partnership with the Nebraska Public Power District, which supplies power to most of the state outside of Omaha and Lincoln. The hitch for Norfolk is that the public utility’s contracts prevent municipal customers from generating more than 10% of their peak load from alternative sources, a threshold the city expects to reach with this project. “Northeast Nebraska is the renewable energy hotbed of the state,” said Norfolk Mayor Josh Moenning. “I’d much rather use clean energy that’s made in our backyard than haul it in on a coal train from Wyoming, which is the status quo in Nebraska.”
  • Nebraska utility could slash emissions at little or no added cost, studies show
    A pair of reports by independent consultants both conclude that the Nebraska Public Power District could eliminate most of its carbon emissions without having to spend significantly more than it would otherwise for power.

TESLA SOLAR ROOFS

Solar energy popularity grows in Iowa, by Maggie O’Brien, The Nonpareil
A Council Bluffs electrical contractor is believed to be the first in Iowa and Nebraska to install Tesla solar roofs at the homes of customers across both states, including one customer who lives near Lake Manawa. PowerTech, which is headquartered in the Bluffs and has an office in Omaha, is awaiting the required permits before beginning construction at all three homes. In addition to the Manawa property, one home is located in rural Nebraska and one in central Iowa.

Weddle & Sons Roofing is also a certified Tesla Solar Roof installer in Nebraska. Office locations include Lincoln and Omaha.

Current job locations / listings on Weddle & Sons’ website Include Lincoln:

You Tube Video: We Installed A Tesla Solar Roof In One Day: Weddle & Sons Roofing

Local View: Don’t hamper wind growth

By Gary Thompson, Lincoln Journal Star

Last month, the Gage County Planning and Zoning Commission voted to recommend to the County Board of Supervisors that amendments be made to existing regulations governing development of wind farms in the county.

Among these was the requirement that each turbine be set back at least one mile away from any non-participating residence. If approved, this would be one of the most restrictive regulations in the nation — and its practical effect would be to ban any further development of wind energy within the county borders. Continue reading here.

Gary Thompson has served as an NPPD Board of Directors member for 27 years. He lives in Clatonia.

Also In Nebraska

Grand Island deepens stake in alternative energy

Editorial, The Grand Island Independent 

As power generation facilities across the U.S. continue to invest in cleaner fuel sources, gas, solar, hydro, wind and nuclear energy alternatives are rapidly replacing coal as the staple. Grand Islanders have long benefited from comparatively low energy costs due in large part to forward-thinking improvements and continued investment in the city’s power generation facilities and alternative energy sources. Grand Island Utilities Department Director Tim Luchsinger spoke to the Grand Island Rotary Club last week about the city’s long-range plan to diversify its electric energy production. Read more here.

Photo Credit: GenPro Energy Solutions

Previously Posted: Pilot project tests potential of solar energy for Grand Island, Neb., American Public Power Association

Grand Island’s Renewable Energy

MORE LOCAL NEWS & OPINION

  • Interim report for the first half year 2020 – Strong first half, Ørsted News Release, Globe Newswire. We commissioned the 230MW onshore wind farm Plum Creek in Nebraska ahead of schedule and on budget, and we received tax equity funding from our partners.
  • About Plum Creek Wind: The 82–turbine Plum Creek Wind located in Wayne County began commercial operation in 2020. Maximum capacity is 230,000 kilowatts (or 230 megawatts). The facility could produce an amount of energy equivalent to the amount of electricity used by approximately 100,000 Nebraska residences in a year (average annual output). Source: Wind Energy Generation in Nebraska, Nebraska Department of Environment & Energy
  • Burt County officials learn about wind energy project as they consider area wind energy guidelines, KTIV
  • Commentary: New farm income — Martin Kleinschmit, owner of MarLin Wind & Solar LLC, Norfolk Daily News. HARTINGTON — Wind power has had a remarkably positive impact on the Nebraska economy. In addition to producing affordable and reliable clean power, wind energy is creating jobs in rural places and contributing significant new tax revenues to local governments and schools. Of all the positive attributes of wind energy, though, one of the most important and understated is the impact it has had on our state’s farmers.
  • First-hand experience to dispel wind energy myths, by Nebraska farmer/rancher Mike Zakrzewski of O’Neill, Nebraska, Blair Enterprise Publishing. For whatever it’s worth, I’m a third-generation farmer/rancher in Holt County, Nebraska. I own and operate the farm I grew up on northeast of O’Neill, in the middle of the Grande Prairie Wind Energy Project. Grande Prairie is a 400-megawatt, 200 turbine project, currently the largest in the state. There are fourteen turbines within one mile of my front door; some are on my land, many more are on my neighbors’ properties. This November will mark four years of operation for the project, so I may have some useful insight regarding living with wind turbines.

RESOURCES FOR NEW FARMERS & RANCHERS

Nebraska partners to provide energy answers for new farmers, ranchers, Hamburg Reporter. These videos are posted on the project team’s YouTube channel, Energy Answers for the Beginning Farmer & Rancher. Additional resources can be found online here. Contributing extension programs include Illinois, Michigan State, Nebraska, Penn State, Rutgers, Virginia Tech, and Wisconsin.

AMERICAN WIND WEEK – INTO THE WIND POSTS

City council to consider approving agreement for wind energy project

By Austin Koeller, Grand Island Independent

The Grand Island City Council will consider approving a public power agreement with Prairie Hills Wind at its meeting on Tuesday. The city has been investing in wind energy projects over the past few years, City Administrator Marlan Ferguson said. A project near Albion was completed in fall 2015. The proposed agreement with Prairie Hills Wind is for a project near Callaway. Continue reading.

 MORE RENEWABLE ENERGY NEWS

City’s coal-fired power plant entering its twilight

by Tracy Overstreet, The Grand Island Independent

Grand Island’s coal-fired power plant, the Platte Generating Station, has been a rock star.

“Grand Island has never run a plant as long and as hard as we have Platte,” Utilities Director Tim Luchsinger said.

The 100-megawatt plant went on line in 1982 and has provided low-cost, baseload-level electricity ever since.

But a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Monday upholding the Environmental Protection Agency’s enforcement of greener energy policies has raised questions about the future of coal-fired plants such as Platte.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if we don’t see a lot of operation of Platte by 2030,” Luchsinger said. “It may be retired by then.”

That projected retirement may come as a surprise to some, particularly as the plant undergoes a $42 million pollution-control upgrade that will be complete in November. But it’s not so surprising to those in the energy industry.

To continue reading, click here:
http://www.theindependent.com/news/local/city-s-coal-fired-power-plant-entering-its-twilight/article_00459ea2-ff49-11e3-be5e-0019bb2963f4.html