Tag Archives: Center for Rural Affairs

Tri-State announces transformative Responsible Energy Plan

Tri-State News Release

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association is pursuing an aggressive Responsible Energy Plan to transition to a cleaner energy portfolio, while ensuring reliability, increasing member flexibility and with a goal to lower wholesale rates.

“Our membership and board are unified in our pursuit of a cleaner, reliable and lower-cost resource portfolio,” said Rick Gordon, chairman of the cooperative’s board of directors. “We are making a strong and unequivocal commitment to transform Tri-State’s resource portfolio in a prudent and responsible manner.” Continue reading here.

From Tri-State’s Website

Our cooperative approach to a clean grid starts now.
We are pursuing an aggressive transition to a cleaner energy portfolio.

How we are transforming

  1. Developing a Responsible Energy Plan [to] comply with aggressive carbon reduction, renewable energy and resource planning requirements, ensure reliability and affordability and strive to lower wholesale rates while maintaining our strong financial position.
  2. Engaging with former Colorado Governor Bill Ritter and the Center for the New Energy Economy to facilitate a stakeholder process that will contribute to our Responsible Energy Plan.
  3. Creating more opportunities for our members to develop local renewable energy by considering the types of memberships and contracts we offer.
  4. Increasing our renewable resources, with new wind and solar projects and a request for proposals for even more projects.
  5. Exploring opportunities with solar and energy services providers to make more community-scale solar, energy storage and electric vehicle infrastructure more available to our members at a lower cost.

Learn more about Tri-State’s Responsible Energy Plan.

Additional Recommended Reading

Rural America could power a renewable economy – but first we need to solve coal debt

By Joe Smyth, Clean Cooperative

As prices for new wind and solar projects continue to drop, renewable energy is booming across the United States, surpassing coal earlier this year for the first time ever. And most renewable energy projects are built in rural areas, harnessing abundant wind and solar resources. Yet the electric cooperatives that power most of rural America remain particularly reliant on coal – in part because of billions of dollars in debt on increasingly uneconomic coal plants.

Solving this coal debt problem in rural America is the focus of a new report by the Center for Rural Affairs, We Own It, and CURE (Clean Up the River Environment). Rural Electrification 2.0: The Transition to a Clean Energy Economy explores strategies that policymakers and electric cooperatives could pursue to restructure or eliminate debt that is currently tied up with uneconomic coal plants. Continue reading here.

NRECA Infographic: While electric cooperatives have begun to add more new renewable energy projects in recent years, overall they still remain more reliant on coal than other utilities. According to the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, coal accounts for 40% of electric cooperatives’ fuel mix, compared to 27% nationally. – Joe Smyth

Smyth’s list of recommended reading on electric cooperatives and coal debt:

He also provides a list of further reading on presidential candidates’ plans on climate, energy, and food.

Census of Agriculture shows more renewables on farms

By Kayla Bergman, Center for Rural Affairs

Farmers are increasingly adopting renewable energy on their farms.  According to the U.S. Census of Agriculture, released on April 11, 2019, solar and geothermal energy systems on farms have increased significantly since the last Census in 2012. In 2017, there were 133,176 farms producing renewable energy—more than double the 2012 total. The Census reports 90,142 farms had solar energy production in 2017, a 60 percent increase from the 36,331 farms reported in the 2012 census. Solar production has become increasingly popular, especially on farms, in recent years. Continue reading here.

Photo: DeBlauw Family Farm in Hartington, Nebraska
Project: 10.4-kilowatt net-metered photovoltaic system that provides the owners, Marvin and Debra DeBlauw, 75-80% of their farm’s energy needs.
Installers: MarLin Wind & Solar and North Star Solar Bears

See Solar Examples for additional photos and brief descriptions of just some of Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers who have installed renewable energy projects to power their operations.

Rural Jobs: A Big Reason Midwest Should Love Clean Energy

By Dan Gearino, Inside Climate News

Wind turbines have become a familiar part of the landscape in the rural Midwest, and with them have come jobs, income for farmers and tax revenue for communities. They’re one sign of how the clean energy transition is helping to transform areas that sometimes struggle to attract jobs and investment.

A new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council shows the extent to which clean energy is contributing jobs to the rural economies of 12 Midwestern states. It also reflects what the rural Midwest stands to lose from Trump administration actions that harm clean energy, such as its recent call to eliminate subsidies for renewable energy, its tariffs on solar energy equipment, and its plan to weaken the Obama-era Clean Power Plan. The authors say the numbers underscore the need in the Midwest for government policies that are supportive of clean energy instead. Read more here.

Dan Gearino covers the U.S. Midwest, part of Inside Climate News’ National Environment Reporting Network. His coverage deals with the business side of the clean-energy transition, and he writes Inside Climate News’ Clean Economy Weekly Newsletter.

Image: Pixabay / Public Domain

RESOURCES: SOLAR & WIND ENERGY JOBS

Property values near wind energy projects show no decline

The Grand Island Independent, Opinion written by Lu Nelson,
Policy Associate at the Center for Rural Affairs

In many public forums across Nebraska, local residents have expressed concerns related to proposed wind energy projects in their communities. A consistent worry is the effect wind farms would have on neighboring property values.

In response to these concerns, the Center for Rural Affairs prepared a fact sheet that reviews findings of studies conducted by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory — as well as the Universities of Rhode Island and Connecticut — which analyze factors influencing property values prior to the announcement of a project, after the announcement, before construction and post-construction. Read more here.

The fact sheet may be found here.

Norfolk Daily News: Reasonable wind regulations should be goal

Madison County officials — including members of the county board and the joint planning commission — have been prudent in taking their time before moving ahead with possible changes to the county’s regulations governing wind energy . . . Our desire is that Madison County be a place where reasonable restrictions are adopted that provide a level of reassurance and protection for those who aren’t big fans — pardon the pun — of the turbines in the countryside. Yet we want Madison County to be a place where its natural wind energy potential can be developed in order to provide additional property tax revenue, and jobs during the construction period and once operating. Read more here

Map: World Atlas

UPDATE: AUGUST 18
Madison County gets input on wind regulations, by Jerry Guenther, Norfolk Daily News
On Thursday evening, the Madison County Joint Planning Commission continued discussions on the regulations, with hopes of hosting a public hearing on them next month. If there are no major changes based on the input from the hearing, the regulations could be forwarded to the board of commissioners for consideration in October.

RESOURCES: CENTER FOR RURAL AFFAIRS 

ALSO HAPPENING IN NEBRASKA

Clean energy provides Nebraska jobs

The Grand Island Independent

LINCOLN — More than 18,400 Nebraska residents now work in clean energy industries in 92 out of 93 counties in the state, according to a new analysis of energy jobs data from Clean Energy Trust and the national, nonpartisan business group E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs). Nebraska’s clean energy workforce now employs more than 5 times as many people than all the computer programmers and web developers in the state, according to Department of Labor Employment Statistics. Read more here.

Photo Credit: iStock

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

  • Inside Business: Kutak Rock, Omaha World-Herald
    During Mr. Bracht’s tenure as Director of the Nebraska Energy Office, the state’s solar developments expanded by 20-fold from just over one megawatt to more than 25 megawatts. In addition, Nebraska now exceeds 1.4 gigawatt of operating wind farms, and at the completion of projects under development will have more than 2.4 gigawatts.
  • LED streetlight program moving forward, The Wire, OPPD Blog
    Beginning in September, OPPD representatives will meet with municipalities, counties and other streetlight customers about the transition from high-pressure sodium fixtures to LED fixtures. The utility is finalizing which LED fixture design it will go with, looking at several options to determine which will be the best for customers both in terms of cost and function.
  • Rural electric cooperatives look at cutting the cord, Colorado Springs Gazette
    At least four cooperatives — United Power, the Delta-Montrose Electric Association, the La Plata Electric Association and San Miguel — have hit the 5 percent cap, and four more are near the limit, according to a survey by Clean Cooperative. Tri-State Members’ Service Territories include Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico and Wyoming.
    In Nebraska:
    CR Chimney Rock Public Power District, Bayard
    MW The Midwest Electric Cooperative Corporation, Grant
    NW Northwest Rural Public Power District, Hay Springs
    PH Panhandle Rural Electric Membership Association, Alliance
    RS Roosevelt Public Power District, Scottsbluff
    WB Wheat Belt Public Power District, Sidney

  • America’s Electric Cooperatives, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Fact Sheets (PDF)
  • Study: Wind farms do not hurt property values, Nebraska Radio Network Contributor, Lu Nelsen, Policy Associate, Center for Rural Affairs

Renewable energy can charge up rural economies

By Mark Mahoney, nwestiowa.com

Lucas Nelsen

REGIONAL—The Center for Rural Affairs is strongly supportive of renewable energy. Those words come from Lucas Nelsen, policy program associate for the Lyons, NE-based nonprofit organization, which earlier this year released, “Powering Iowa: Rural Perspectives on Iowa’s Renewable Energy Transformation,” a research report examining renewable energy development in the Hawkeye State. Nelsen explained why the center is in favor of renewable energy.
Continue here.

Center for Rural Affairs explores renewable energy issues

By Joseph Hopper, Spencer Daily Reporter

The Nebraska and Iowa-based nonprofit, the Center for Rural Affairs, recently published a number of publications focusing on renewable energy in Iowa. Its most recent research publication, entitled “Powering Iowa: Rural Perspectives on Iowa’s Renewable Energy Transformation,” highlighted current opinions on various renewable energy issues, such as wind turbines and transmission line development. In addition to the center’s study on opinions of renewable energy, the center authored a white paper on wind energy ordinances in the state and a second publication examining incentives for tax revenue from transmission lines. Read the entire article here.

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

Highline is 80 Years Strong: Electric cooperative celebrates with members at annual meeting, by Darci Tomky, The Holyoke Enterprise
Of the energy sold to members from Tri-State, about 30 percent was generated from renewable sources last year. That’s a considerable increase from the 17 percent reported in 2007. “That is the largest percentage of renewables in generation and transmission companies across the country and one of the highest of any utility in the U.S.” said Farnsworth. Included in Highline’s renewable projects is the Trailblazer Waste Heat Generation Site. Emphasizing its value to Highline, Farnsworth said it has brought $2.3 million to Highline’s bottom line since 2009. Highline is currently looking at options for a utility scale solar project that could provide savings to members over the next 20 to 25 years.

Nebraska Cooperatives Currently Using Solar & Wind

  • NRECA’s Interactive Map: Cooperative Solar Across the Country, shows that 443 cooperatives in 43 states utilize solar as a source of power. Eight Nebraska co-ops currently use solar, following: Georgia (42), Minnesota (37), North Carolina (26), Tennessee (24), Colorado (23), Indiana (23), Iowa (22), Oklahoma (21), South Carolina (21), Wisconsin (19), Arkansas (18), New Mexico (16), Mississippi (14), Illinois (13) Texas (11), Virginia (11), Alabama (10), Florida (9), and Wyoming (9). Click here and scroll down to individual states’ information.
  • NRECA’s Interactive Map: Cooperative Wind Across the Country, shows that.564 cooperatives in 37 states use wind as a source of power. Thirty Nebraska co-ops utilize wind energy, following Minnesota (44), Missouri (41), Indiana (38), and Iowa (31). Click here and scroll down to individual states’ information, including a list of all 30 Nebraska cooperatives using wind.

Center for Rural Affairs Releases Information Guide: Wind Energy Ordinances

Introduction
Wind turbines are multiplying across the U.S., and most are installed in rural areas overlooking crops, cattle, timber, and lakes. Rural communities have experienced several benefits from the development of wind energy, but the growth of the industry has also presented a challenge in the form of local regulations that may be insufficient or out-of-date.

Wind ordinances on the city, county, and state levels may be hard to understand, whether you are an expert or just becoming familiar with the industry. The Center for Rural Affairs has gathered some helpful items to note when reviewing ordinances. Download the guide here.