Supreme Court rejects EPA ability to set fleet-wide GHG emissions standards for power plants

By Ethan Howland, Utility Dive

The Environmental Protection Agency cannot set fleet-wide greenhouse gas emissions limits for existing power plants under the Clean Air Act’s Section 111(d), the Supreme Court ruled Thursday, dismissing arguments raised by a group of electric utilities, the Biden administration and others.

“Today’s ruling limits the tools available to the [EPA] to sensibly reduce power plant emissions using cost-effective strategies that reflect the realities of an electric power system that is increasingly dynamic and diverse,” Jeff Dennis, Advanced Energy Economy general counsel and managing director, said in a statement. “In light of this Supreme Court decision, it will fall to Congress, state policymakers, and the markets to drive the transition to a clean energy economy.” Read more here.

Posted July 1: EPA retains tools to cut power sector GHG emissions despite Supreme Court curbing its authority: attorneys, by Ethan Howland, Utility Dive

THE WHITE HOUSE BRIEFING ROOM

  • Statement by President Joe Biden on Supreme Court Ruling on West Virginia v. EPA
    My Administration will continue using lawful executive authority, including the EPA’s legally-upheld authorities, to keep our air clean, protect public health, and tackle the climate crisis. We will work with states and cities to pass and uphold laws that protect their citizens. And we will keep pushing for additional Congressional action, so that Americans can fully seize the economic opportunities, cost-saving benefits, and security of a clean energy future. Together, we will tackle environmental injustice, create good-paying jobs, and lower costs for families building the clean energy economy.
  • Previously Posted: FACT SHEET: Biden Administration Roadmap to Build an Economy Resilient to Climate Change Impacts: Agency Actions Will Protect Retirement Plans, Homeowners, Consumers, Businesses and Supply Chains, Workers, and the Federal Government from Financial Risks of Climate Change

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING

U.S. Climate Alliance Responds to Harmful U.S. Supreme Court Decision in West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Climate Alliance is a bipartisan coalition of 24 governors working together to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement. Collectively, they represent 59 percent of the U.S. economy, 54 percent of the U.S. population, 42 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

See Also: U.S. Climate Alliance Governors: “We Need a Bold Climate and Clean Energy Package from Congress”

Statements From Climate Mayors Co-Chairs in Response to Supreme Court Ruling on West Virginia v. EPA

About Climate Mayors: Representing over 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 474 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014 by 3 mayors, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Agreement in June 2017. Climate Mayors is committed to accelerating equitable climate action to help each member city achieve their climate goals, while working together city-to-city, with states, and the Biden administration to increase national climate ambition. For more information, visit:
www.climatemayors.org

Supreme Court Slashes EPA’s Ability to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Solar Energy Industries Association 

“The power to reduce greenhouse gas emissions rests with Congress, and it is more urgent than ever that Congress take swift action to codify climate protecting policies that will also advance America’s clean energy deployment at a more rapid pace.” Abigail Ross Hopper, SEIA President and CEO

ACP CEO Heather Zichal statement on disappointing Supreme Court ruling in West Virginia vs. EPA, American Clean Power Association

By weakening one of the Administration’s chief tools to reduce the damage from greenhouse gases, the Court’s decision highlights the need for swift congressional action on passing the climate provisions in the reconciliation package—which will move the nation forward on the path to cutting emissions in half by 2030 while achieving real energy independence, building good jobs, and lowering energy costs for consumers.”  

MORE FROM THE WHITE HOUSE 

FACT SHEET:  Health Sector Leaders Join Biden Administration’s Pledge to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions 50% by 2030

Today, the Biden-Harris Administration announced that 61 of the largest U.S. hospital and health sector companies responded to the Administration’s Health Sector Climate Pledge, committing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 50% by 2030. The new commitments represent over 650 hospitals and thousands of other providers across the country, and include plans to strengthen resilience to climate change, protect public health, and lower costs.