How to view the purchase of wind power by Vail Resorts

By Allen Best, Mountain Town News

By any measure, the Vail Resorts power play announced in November was big. Vail’s virtual power-purchase agreement will give it 310,000-megawatt-hours of production annually from the Plum Creek Wind Project near Wayne, Neb., beginning in 2020. That’s sufficient, says the company, to meet the company’s projected fiscal year 2019 electricity use at its North American operations. With this, the company will have achieved 100 percent net-zero emissions a decade ahead of its 2030 goal.

Others in corporate America have been hurrying to make the same claim. The Rocky Mountain Institute, an energy think tank, reported in October that corporate purchases were expected to surpass five gigawatts of power in 2018. That’s roughly a 1,600 percent increase from 2013. Among the big buyers: Facebook, AT&T, Walmart, and Microsoft. Continue reading here.

This story, with slightly different text, was originally published in the January-February issue of Ski Area Management.

About the Author
Allen Best is a Colorado-based journalist. He publishes a subscription-based e-zine called Mountain Town News, portions of which are published on the website of the same name, and also writes for a variety of newspapers and magazines. View all posts by Allen Best.

About Vail Resorts Corporation

Lincoln Clean Energy photo of the partially-completed Plum Creek Wind Farm in Wayne County, Nebraska. Once operational, the project will create high-paying local jobs and will result in over $3 million in local community benefits annually in the Wayne County area. This includes much needed property tax revenues, with some of the largest beneficiaries being the Norfolk and Winside school districts.

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