San Diego Mulls Whether to Let City, Not Utility , Buy Alternative Energy

By Claire Trageser, NET Nebraska / Copyright KPBS-FM

NPRSan Diego is the largest city in the country to commit to using only renewable energy, a goal that political parties, environmentalists and business groups hope to meet over the next 20 years . . . Everybody’s on board now, but there could be trouble brewing on the horizon. The problem is whether to set up an alternative energy program that would put the city in charge of buying electricity instead of the power company. It’s called community choice aggregation. “Imagine if you only had a single option for wireless service,” says Ty Tosdal, an energy regulation lawyer. “It wouldn’t present any kind of competitive pressure on companies to bring their prices down.” Continue reading. 

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Study: Grid For Renewables Key to Cutting Emissions, by Bobby Magill, Climate Central
Climate CentralCarbon dioxide emissions from generating electricity could be cut by 78 percent within the next 15 years if the country makes the same Herculean effort to expand solar and wind technology that it did to build the Interstate Highway System. That’s the conclusion of a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) study published Monday in Nature Climate Change, which shows that a new system of transcontinental transmission lines connected to wind and solar farms nationwide is the key to dramatically reducing emissions from the nation’s power plants. Photo Credit: Lollie-pop/Flickr