SOLAR EXAMPLES

This is a work-in-progress. If you’ve installed solar on your Nebraska home, business, or nonprofit and would like to include your project in this resource, please send a brief description, one or two photos, and (optional) any links to news stories or announcements about it to Helen Deffenbacher: nebraskansforsolar@gmail.com. To view additional solar examples, visit the websites of the installers / developers who have listed their businesses in our directory.

AC COUPLED-BATTERY BACKUP SOLAR

This 14-kilowatt solar array serves two purposes. Not only does it offset the homeowners’ electrical usage from day to day, but also it maintains a battery system for when the utility grid goes down. If the home does lose power, the battery system will automatically power the whole home indefinitely.
Installer: Dixon Power Systems

ALLAN STENZEL HOME IN MONROE

Project: 6.6-kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) system
Installer: Renewable Solar LLC

ARBORS IN HARTINGTON

Project: Two solar arbors (10.6 kilowatts or 40 modules) in Hartington, generating $110-$120/month of renewable energy and providing a shady place for warm-weather picnics, visiting with neighbors or reading. Over the lifespan of the solar systems, which typically last 25 years, that adds up to $33,000 to $36,000 in today’s energy dollars. The metal frames, or racking systems, are made in Nebraska by Knopik Engineering.
Installers: MarLin Wind & Solar and North Star Solar Bears

ARNIE & MARILYN’S HOUSE IN PAPILLION

IMG_0004Project: 3-kilowatt installation, with 8 south-facing panels on the side of the house and 4 on the roof. The system offsets their home’s power use during the day and charges their plug-in Chevrolet Volt every night, which is then driven on battery for pennies a mile the next day.
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric

BELLER FARM NEAR LINDSAY, NEBRASKA

Photo: Mike Beller

Project: solar-powered center pivot irrigation system  – 25 kilowatts
News Story: Solar-powered pivots: Family’s project produces surplus energy, holds potential for rest of Nebraska
Photo by Mike Beller
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric

BELLEVUE PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING

Courtesy Photo

Project:  7-kilowatt grid-tied installation on Bellevue’s Public Safety Building, 1510 Wall Street, Bellevue, Nebraska.
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric

BLAKEMAN RANCH 

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Project: 650-kilowatt array on the Blakeman Ranch in Custer County.
Installer: Innovative Solar LLC

BOB & GINA’S HOME IN LINCOLN

Project: Three proposals were offered for the home with varying degrees of energy savings. Bob and Gina decided to go with the largest system, designed to provide 11% more energy than they actually use. Lincoln Electric System offers the full retail rate for excess power sent back to the grid. The more power they conserve, the more they send back to the grid. Gina tracks the system’s performance using her I-phone. Every panel is monitored individually to provide easy diagnostics. It also keeps track of daily, monthly, yearly and lifetime system output.
Installer: SWT Energy

BREHM HOME IN BLAIR


Project: 11.4-kilowatt net-metered, no-battery system (forty 285-watt Solar World panels), installed December 2016. Jeff Brehm writes that, “Even with the trees surrounding the house, we get 5+ hours of sunlight on most of the roof, which is expected for our part of the country, according to various online solar maps I’ve seen. Our ranch-style, single-story home provides relatively easy access to the panels for cleaning. With ranch-style homes being as narrow as they are, I had to make the most of my situation/orientation; the majority (thirty-two) of the panels face west, the remaining eight face south.  I’m a semi-retired 20+ year U.S. Air Force Veteran, with an IT and electronics-maintenance background, so I have the time to keep these beauties clean! Nebraskans for Solar has invited us to be a part of future tours, which we’re happy to do.”
Designer: EnergyONE Solar https://energyonesolar.com
Installer: Langer Electric in Blair

BRUMMOND FARM

Greg Brummond of Craig, Nebraska, now powers half his corn and soybean farm with solar energy. (Photo by Brian Seifferlein, Harvest Public Media)

Project: 10-kilowatt solar system, which powers half of Greg Brummond’s corn and soybean farm.
Source: Growing renewable energy resources to farm with less fossil fuels, by Grant Gerlock, Harvest Public Media:
Photo: Greg Brummond of Craig, Nebraska. Credit: Brian Seifferlein, Harvest Public Media
Installer: GC Resolve

CENTRAL CITY SOLAR DEVELOPMENT
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Project: 200-kilowatt system consisting of 800 solar panels installed on an abandoned parking lot in Central City. Developer Cliff Mesner worked with several other local businesses and the city-owned utility to develop the project.
News Story: With projects popping up across Nebraska, future of solar power brightens, Omaha World-Herald
Installers: Mesner Solar Development and Solar Heat & Electric

CHARGE N’ GO

Dixon Power Systems is proud to introduce the Charge ‘N Go, a portable charging station for mobile devices. The Charge ‘N Go is a custom design by Dixon Power Systems and provides charging capabilities where the utility grid is not available or inaccessible. It’s perfect for outdoor events, college & university campuses, corporate campus, high schools, even camp grounds. The design consists of one 310-watt bi-facial solar panel, a 12-volt battery system for 24 hour operation, and 6 intelligent device recognition USB ports for up to 4.8 amps to charge devices as fast as possible. Available for purchase or rental.

COUNTRY SWIM SCHOOL IN BENNET

Project: 20-kilowatt solar system in the Norris Public Power District. A combination of systems was proposed to greatly reduce the load. The owner decided to install the photovoltaic system first, offsetting a significant amount of the energy load. A thermal solar application would help heat the pool and hot water for the locker rooms. The thermal solar application is planned for 2017. The PV and thermal solar systems combined would have a payback of less than seven years. The monitoring for the PV system is waiting on a wireless internet provider for the area. Once this connection is made, the owner will be able to monitor the system online.
Designer: SWT Energy
Installer:
J-Tech Solar

CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY’S PARKING LOT CANOPY

Photo: Creighton University

Project: 85-kilowatt solar canopy on the Cuming Street parking lot. A second installation, a 20.5 kW south-facing solar system is atop the Kiewit Fitness Center.
Creighton University’s Energy Technology Program
Photo Credit: Creighton University

CUSTOM SOLAR CANOPY

This custom designed canopy by Dixon Power Systems features glass on glass bi-facial solar modules allowing sunlight to pass through individual solar cells, harvesting sunlight on both sides. Integrated into the homeowners’ deck, the canopy provides shade similar to standing under a tree. The structure is made from cedar with steel brackets that are also custom designed and built by Dixon Power Systems.

CYNTHIA & JOHN’S HOUSE IN RALSTON

            west exposure

Project: 8.16-kilowatt photovoltaic system installed in September 2012, with panels oriented to the west and south. There are 34 micro inverters. “We were able to take advantage of the 30% federal solar tax credit  Whereas LES and Mid America reimburse excess energy production at the same rate as they charge for energy, OPPD has a much lower rate of reimbursement to customers. Our OPPD killowat-hour usage is subtracted from our kilowatt-hour net meter.  We then receive credit for this amount multiplied by $0.04 in June-September and $0.0352 October-May.  Countering this, we always have set charges of about $13 every month.  At the end of the calendar year, any excess credit is paid to us. In May 2013 OPPD installed meters so we could track our usage.  Since then, our total payment to OPPD for our well-insulated 2100 sq ft home has been $86.00.”
Resource: Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE)
Installer: SWT Energy 

south exposure 

south exposure

DAGEFORDE NET-ZERO ENERGY HOME 

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Project: 7.8-kilowatt solar array after additional panels were installed Spring of 2016. The array provides a minimum of 100% of the household’s energy needs (289% in June 2016). The home was the First Place Winner of ASHRAE’s 2014 International Technology Award for achievement in the design and operation of Energy Efficient Buildings. Founded in 1894, ASHRAE is the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, a global nonprofit association. Additional features of the Dageforde home include

  • Concrete house (Insulated Concrete Form)
  • Passive solar design – aids heating need
  • Geothermal water-to-water heat pumps for heating and cooling and domestic hot water generation
  • Radiant heating and cooling embedded in a concrete floor
  • Ceramic tile flooring – allowing lower radiant temperatures to heat/cool house resulting in huge energy efficiency
  • Geothermal fresh air system – 160 feet of buried tube with automated fan/valve system providing fresh air, humidity control, and 55 – 65 degree air year-round reducing heating/cooling needs (This means no traditional air conditioning system is ever needed).
  • Domestic water intake pipes embedded in concrete floor – resulting in free cooling and warmer water temperature in hot water generation intake – reducing energy needed
  • Lots of natural lighting
  • Fiberglass windows that do not expand or contract to break any seals

Darren Dageforde is the Executive Director of Utilities & Energy Utilization at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.
RECOMMENDED READING
2014 Ashrae Technology Award Case Studies: First Place, Residential Energy, Efficiency, The Dageforde Residence
The University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) Commits to President Obama’s Better Buildings Challenge
Installers: Do-it-Yourself project by Darren and Karen Dageforde 

DEBLAUW FAMILY FARM IN HARTINGTON

Project: 10.4-kilowatt net-metered photovoltaic system that provides the owners, Marvin and Debra DeBlauw, 75-80% of their farm’s energy needs.
Installers: MarLin Wind & Solar and North Star Solar Bears

DON GASPER’S HOME NEAR LINDSAY

Project: 25-kilowatt solar system with 3-phase, seasonally-adjustable, custom-built frames.
Installer: North Star Solar Bears and MarLin Wind & Solar 

DON PREISTER’S HOME IN BELLEVUE

Project: 8.4-kilowatt, grid-tied, OPPD net-metered system, ground mounted on south-facing slope with no battery storage (yet) and 28 optimizers. Installation was completed in December 2016, with enough capacity for all electrical needs in an all-electric residence of 2000 sq. ft. with a geothermal heat pump. There is extra capacity for a future electric vehicle.
Photo Credit: The Reader 
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric with help from Preister brothers

DUAL DYNAMICS MANUFACTURING COMPANY IN LINCOLN

Project: 24.8-kilowatt ground-mounted solar array consisting of eighty 310-watt solar panels. Underground conductors send power to the meter cabinet attached to the building. Lincoln Electric System provided Dual Dynamics an incentive for the south-facing system in the amount of $9,300 ($375 x 24.8kW) as a capacity payment, as soon as the project was commissioned. LES offers the full retail rate for excess power sent back to the grid. The estimated payback is within ten years.
Installer: SWT Energy

ENVIRONMENTAL TRAILER

This portable environmental trailer is used for ground water remediation, in this case removing diesel fuel spills from ground water. The portable design allows for easy transport from site to site. The trailer features collapsible solar modules for transport and out-riggers to stabilize trailer on uneven terrain and in high winds. The solar array charges a battery system which powers an air compressor for the pneumatic pumps. Designed and built by Dixon Power Systems, this portable trailer is truly one-of-a-kind.

ERIC & KRISTINE’S HOUSE IN OMAHA
Eric's houseProject: 
3-kilowatt, south-facing PV system provides clean electricity for their Dundee home and electric car. Eric, Past President of Nebraskans for Solar, provides tours of his residential solar project.
Installers: Mainly a do-it-yourself project by Eric and Scott Williams and Nebraskans for Solar volunteers, with Michael Shonka of Solar Heat & Electric providing technical advice & assistance.

FAMILY FARM JUST OUTSIDE THE VILLAGE OF CRAIG

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Project: 10-kilowatt solar array just outside the small Village of Craig, Nebraska installed by GC Resolve. This array provides about half the farm’s energy needs. The project was partly funded by a USDA Rural Energy for America (REAP) grant, covering 25% of its cost.
News Story: GC Resolve flourished from its founder’s roots, Fremont Tribune
Installer: GC Resolve

FAMILY FARM IN MINDEN

Kevin Raun

Project: 21-kilowatt solar system in Minden, Nebraska installed by GC Resolve. This array provides most of the farm’s energy needs. The project was partly funded by a USDA Rural Energy for America (REAP) grant, which covered 25% of its cost. Additional financing was obtained through the Nebraska Energy Office’s low-interest loan program for solar installations.
Installer: GC Resolve

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY HOUSES IN OMAHA

Project: Nebraskans for Solar and Habitat for Humanity of Omaha installed this solar hot water system (equivalent to a 3-kW photovoltaic system or twelve 250-watt solar panels) on a South Omaha Habitat for Humanity home in August 2014. This was one of four demonstration houses in our Solar Powering Low-Income Housing Program. In evaluating this model program, and from discussions with Habitat for Humanity of Omaha and other nonprofit leaders, Nebraskans for Solar made the decision to create a second program option, the Solar Trainee & Mentorship Program.
Photo Credit: Blake Johnson / Habitat for Humanity of Omaha
Installers: Blake Johnson and Michael Shonka of Solar Heat & Electric

HAMMOND FARM

Project: 25-kilowatt photovoltaic system powers the Hammond farm operation west of Benedict. The project estimate was $84,864; however, a USDA grant and federal tax credits reduced the cost to only $19,100, with a payback of just over 6 years, after which the farm will benefit from free energy. Solar panels typically last 25 or more years.
Source: Farms flexing solar power, by Nicholas Bergin, Lincoln Journal Star
Photo by Matt Ryerson / Lincoln Journal Star
Installers: MarLin Wind & Solar and North Star Solar Bears

HARMONY NURSERY – BRADSHAW
Project: 25-kilowatt solar system. USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) grant award winner.
Installer: GC Resolve

HENRY DOORLY ZOO SOLAR SHADE CANOPY

Morrissey Engineering worked to develop and engineer this project and SWT Energy was the prime installer. It is located at the Africa Exhibit Skyfari lift landing. This project used bifacial panels that are glass on top and bottom and can actually convert a portion of bottom-side light reflected off surrounding surfaces into additional power. The panels have a 300W rating without the boost from the underside and there are 80 in total.
News Links: Omaha zoo installs solar panels that collect power and provide shade, Omaha World-Herald
Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium Press Release
Power generation: 1-day view: http://egauge34655.egaug.es/58C32/
Moment-by-moment view: http://egauge34655.egaug.es/58C32/?t=5
The solid red line is the amount of power being used.
1.  The red area is the energy (power over a period of time) that is being drawn in from the grid.
2. Clear area under the red line is energy that is being “self-consumed” or generated by solar and used on-site.
3. The green line is solar power production.
4. The green area is energy that is exported into the grid.

HO-CHUNK VILLAGE SOLAR DEVELOPMENT – WINNEBAGO, NEBRASKA

Project: Nebraska’s first tracking solar system and now one of a growing number of solar installations throughout the innovative and award-winning Ho-Chunk Village – Winnebago, Nebraska.
From Ho-Chunk, Inc’s Green Energy Program Description: “Because of our Native heritage, we have a commitment to conserve and protect our natural resources for future generations. That traditional belief is coupled with cutting edge technology to create renewable energy sources on the Winnebago reservation. In 2010, Ho-Chunk, Inc. installed the first active tracking solar panel system in the state of Nebraska. The active tracking, photovoltaic solar energy system was constructed on the roof of Ho-Chunk, Inc. Corporate Offices in Winnebago.   This type of system can supply up to 6% more capacity over regular solar panels.  The system is projected to replace 40% of the current building use.  Additionally, a regular solar panel system was installed on a subsidiary building in Ho-Chunk Village to help increase energy efficiency.”
To learn more, visit www.hochunkinc.com
Installer: Nebraska Renewable Energy Systems

HYDE MEMORIAL OBSERVATORY

Project: 2.2-kilowatt photovoltaic system installed in 2003 as a demonstration project by Lincoln Electric System, Hyde Observatory Board, Lincoln Parks and Recreation, Information Analytics Incorporated, and Alltel. According to a 2008, five-year study, the system has generated nearly 40% of the observatory’s electricity needs.
Source: Cleaner, Greener Lincoln – Renewable Energy Examples
Installer: Dixon Power Systems

JANECE & WAYNE’S HOME IN ASHLAND

20150320_130220 Project: 10.6-kilowatt photovoltaic array, with south- and west-facing solar panels. Both their heating and cooling systems are electric.
Installer: SWT Energy

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JASON’S HOME IN LINCOLN

Project: 4-kilowatt photovoltaic system. Jason, owner of J-Tech Solar, plans to add more modules next year.

JENKINS RANCH NEAR CALLAWAY

Jenkins Ranch

Project: 25-kilowatt system funded, in part, by a USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) grant. The solar array consists of one hundred 225-watt solar panels. The energy it will generate is estimated to replace 112% of the Jenkins’ yearly usage. The ranch has been in their family since 1876.
Source: Jenkins Ranch Installs Solar Panel for Energy Efficiency, Sand Hills Express / Custer County Broadcasting
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric

KEARNEY SOLAR FARM

The 7.2-megawatt solar project is under construction, with a November 2017 completion date.
The farm is located in Kearney’s Northeast Technology Park, otherwise known as Tech One Crossing, at 56th Street and Antelope Avenue. Approximately 23,000 solar panels will be mounted on a tracker-designed racking system. The Kearney Solar Farm will provide about  5% of the electrical energy for the City of Kearney through NPPD. When completed the Kearney Solar Farm will be the largest utility-scale solar project in Nebraska.
Installer: Interconnection Systems, Inc, Central City, Nebraska

KNOPIK FARM NEAR BELGRADE

Project: 15-kilowatt ground-mounted photovoltaic installation
News Story: Belgrade Story Tour Generates Energy And Interest, Center for Rural Affairs
Installers: MarLin Wind & Solar and North Star Solar Bears

KRUGER FARM SOUTH OF LAKE MINATARE

Project: 11-kilowatt system consisting of thirty-six 305-watt panels. The farm also has a passive solar cabin with a trombe wall and an active water unit with 550 gallons on storage.
January 1, 2017 Update: “Another good year generating our own homegrown energy. Since August 1, 2015 our 11-kilowatt solar array has produced 26,350-kilowatt hours (kWh). For the past seventeen months we are a little over 1.35 months’ ahead on production over consumption.  The November 2016 bill was approximately $30, compared to November 2014 of about $200.00. Our best month was May of 2016. I really appreciate those who helped me put this project together.  From the day we decided to do it to the day the system started generating power took only 45 days. A lot of hard work and a great education, which I hope to pass along to others interested in installing solar.” – Tony Kruger
Video: Western Nebraska Passive Solar Home, by Aaron Kruger
Resource: Build It Solar’s online plans for a simple solar wall collector for space heating
Installers: Do-It-Yourself project by Tony and Aaron Kruger

KUSH FARM IN MONROE

Project: 25-kilowatt photovoltaic system installed by Anthony Kush, owner of Renewable Solar LLC in Monroe

LARRY & LANETTE STEC”S HOME NEAR MONROE 

Project: 10-kilowatt solar system with 3-phase, seasonally-adjustable, custom-made frames.
Installer: North Star Solar Bears and MarLin Wind & Solar

LINCOLN ELECTRIC SYSTEM’S COMMUNITY SOLAR PROJECT

Generating 5 megawatts of solar energy, the LES community solar facility is currently Nebraska’s largest and first utility-scale solar installation. The solar farm is located on a portion of a 46-acre site near Northwest 75th and Holdrege Streets.
LES’ Community Solar program offers two options:
1) SunShares: By adding a donation to their monthly bill, LES customers help support solar energy in the Lincoln area. Each SunShare is $1 per month; a three-share ($3) minimum is required.
2) Virtual Net Metering Program: LES customers can invest in “virtual” solar panels representing a portion of the community solar facility’s output. Each virtual panel requires a one-time $685 enrollment fee that results in a credit on the customer’s bill each month. This credit correlates to the level of investment and the actual energy production of the solar facility.
Brochure
LES’ Community Solar Program

LINCOLN ELECTRIC SYSTEM’S WALTER A. CANNEY SERVICE CENTER

Project: Lincoln Electric System added 50 kilowatts of solar energy through a rooftop solar array commissioned in early December 2014 on the LES Walter A. Canney Service Center at 27th and Fairfield Streets in north Lincoln.
Live Performance Monitoring
Photo: Randy Hampton / Lincoln Journal Star
Developers: Morrissey Engineering and Solar Heat & Electric

LINCOLN POLICE DEPARTMENT’S CENTER TEAM STATION

Project: 10-kilowatt photovoltaic system (40 solar panels) installed in June 2013 on one of Lincoln’s most energy-efficient buildings, with geothermal heating and cooling. The array faces south, on 27th and Holdrege Streets.
Photo: Lincoln Journal Star
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric

MERISTEM ORGANIC FARM AND NURSERY IN PAPILLION

The solar panels heat a 700-gallon water tank that powers a propagating bench for the farm’s aronia berry plants. Owner, Tom Lundahl, received a grant to purchase the used solar panels.
News story: Papillion farmer installing solar panels says renewable energy is future of farming, KETV

MORRISSEY ENGINEERING’S LEED PLATINUM BUILDING

Project: 27-kilowatt Photovoltaic System Expansion on Morrissey Engineering’s LEED Platinum Building, 4940 North 118th Street in Omaha.
Resource: Website post by Jared Friesen, Renewable Energy Specialist at Morrissey Engineering
Performance Monitoring Link
Installer: Morrissey Engineering

MSS ENTERPRISE PROJECT NEAR COZAD

Project: 390-kilowatt solar array installed near Cozad, Nebraska. There are 1224 solar panels producing energy supplied to Dawson Power.
Installer: Innovative Solar, Holdrege, Nebraska

NANCY & ALAN’S SOLAR ARRAY 

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Project: 5-kilowatt solar array installed near their farmhouse, built in 1904. The 3200-square-feet home is nearly all-electric. Nancy wrote: “The array’s adjustable mounting system is easy to operate. In winter when the array is nearly vertical, it resists heavy snow accumulation. In fact, on sunny days with snow on the ground, we get enhanced output due to the albedo effect. The installation included a new bi-directional meter which allows us to put excess energy back into the grid for credit. One thing I especially like about our array is the monitoring system our installer, Randy Schantell, set up for us on the computer.  The monitor allows us to see electrical output of the array in real time. The photo shows a group of local high school students studying renewable energy who visited us in 2014. Randy graciously drove up from Lincoln to help us with that event. In addition to our solar array, we’ve installed a rooftop solar hot water system, geothermal, passive solar heat mass, LED light bulbs,and insulation.”
Installer: SWT Energy

NET-ZERO ENERGY HOUSE IN GERING

Project: Residential 5-kilowatt photovoltaic system, which generates enough electricity to make the home a net-zero energy house.
Photo: Larry Cooper
Installer: Nebraska Wind and Solar

NET-ZERO ENERGY BUILDING IN OMAHA

Project: 8.6-kilowatt system that will result in net-zero energy consumption during OPPD’s most expensive summer months of June-September. Panels were installed on a curved, standing- seam metal roof.
Installer: Morrissey Engineering

NORFOLK OPERATIONS CENTER – NEBRASKA PUBLIC POWER DISTRICT
Norfolk Operations Center

Project: 45.6-kilowatt photovoltaic array (147 panels) at NPPD’s Norfolk LEED Gold facility that began generating energy in August 2010. It’s called the SunCarrier photovoltaic system. The solar panels were made in Malaysia and the rotating frame, which is programmed to automatically reset each day to the orientation of the rising sun, was fabricated by Behlen Manufacturing Company.

OPPD’S LEED PLATINUM SERVICE CENTER

Project: Located on a 13-acre tract, Omaha Public Power District’s Service Center at 5520 Lindbergh Drive boasts a 60-kilowatt array of solar panels, a 1.2-kilowatt vertical-axis wind turbine, and LED yard lighting. For its many innovative features, the Center was awarded Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum designation. Additional sustainability features include daylight harvesting, ground loop heat exchange, operational windows, occupancy sensors, white roofing material, use of recycled materials, water saving plumbing fixtures, pervious pavement, natural ground cover, storm water retention area, storm sewer inserts to mitigate oil spill threat—and more! OPPD incorporated these sustainability features to demonstrate their applicability, a benefit for customers interested in applying them in their homes and businesses.

PANDORF LAND & CATTLE COMPANY RANCH

Photo: Rural Radio Network / KTIC
Project:
600-kilowatt solar array on the Pandorf Land & Cattle Company Ranch in Custer County, northwest of Callaway. The solar array is estimated to generate sufficient electricity to power 60 homes or 10 to 12 center-pivot irrigation systems. The project was partially funded by a USDA Renewable Energy for America Program (REAP) grant.
News Sources: 600 Kilowatt Solar Array Located on Custer County Ranch, by Dave Schroeder, Rural Radio Network / KTIC 
Here comes the sun, by Kamie Stephen, North Platte Telegraph
Photo: Rural Radio Network / KTIC
Installer: Innovative Solar

PAT’S GARAGE
photo (3)
Project:  “I had six solar panels (1.5 kw) installed on my garage in November 2013. Between 2013 and 2014, the system produced almost exactly the energy that I used.  Since last November I have had one electric bill of about $8. With energy-efficient appliances and conservation, this is quite possible. The total cost of the panels, after state and federal tax credits, was $2300. The house is relatively small (1700 square feet).  I had the panels installed on the garage since my house is very well-shaded.  MidAmerica is my energy provider here in Iowa.  Any excess energy I produce is credited back to me at the same price it costs. So far, I have had no problems with the panels and am incredibly pleased with them.”
Resource: Iowa Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE)
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric

POLICE & FIRE DEPARTMENT BUILDING IN THE VILLAGE OF WINNEBAGO

Project: 23.5-killowatt photovoltaic system installed in April 2015 on the Tribal Police & Fire Department Building in the Village of Winnebago in Northeast Nebraska.
Installer: Solar Heat & Electric

POWELL FARM – OAKLAND

Project: 25-kilowatt solar system. USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP] grant award winner.
Installer: GC Resolve

PRAIRIE HILL LEARNING CENTER IN ROCA

Nebraska, one of two "hybrid schools" (wind and solar). Nebraska has no other K-12 solar schools.

Project: Prairie Hill’s Renewable Energy Education Center features straw bale construction, passive solar and photovoltaic panels, energy monitoring equipment, a 10 kW wind turbine, low voltage light fixtures, recycled denim insulation, rain collection, and low-flow toilets.
Installer: Dixon Power Systems

QUIKBYKE SOLAR 

QuikByke is a start-up electric bike rental company headquartered in Omaha. Dixon Power Systems is responsible for the design and installation of the solar array, batteries and energy management system. The entire container is energy independent from the utility grid and is solely dependent on the solar array and battery system. Everything from charging the bikes, interior lighting, computer kiosk, and Wi-Fi network is powered from the sun!

RAVENNA SOLAR AND WIND HYBRID INSTALLATION

Project: Nebraska’s first solar and wind hybrid project installed at a public school.
News Report: Nebraska Public School System Adds Wind-Solar Hybrid Energy Installation
Photo: Pika Energy
Installers: Maine-based Pika Energy and Piedmont, South Dakota-based GenPro Energy Solutions

RESIDENTIAL ROOFTOP SOLAR EXAMPLES IN LINCOLN

Project: 5.7-kilowatt PV system – Tim’s House
See Also:
Bob’s Garage in Northwest Lincoln – 6.9-kilowatt PV System
Jessica’s House in South Lincoln – 3.5-kilowatt PV System
Mark’s Roof in Capitol Beach – 4-kilowatt PV System
Source: City of Lincoln’s Cleaner Greener Lincoln Initiative

RICHARDS FARM – OAKLAND

Project: 25-kilowatt photovoltaic system.
Installer: GC Resolve

SCOTTSBLUFF COMMUNITY SOLAR

Project: Central City-based Mesner Development Company, GenPro, and Nebraska Public Power District developed the project. NPPD customers can sign up for the SunWise pilot program at the utility company’s billing office at 515 First Avenue in Scottsbluff.

A total of 135 solar shares are available. Each solar share = 150 kilowatt-hours per month, the minimum participation level. The maximum participation level is the number of solar shares equal to 80% of a customer’s total annual energy consumption.

For example, if a customer uses an average of 1,000 kilowatt hours per month, 80% = 750 kilowatt-hours or up to five solar shares. Once the 135 solar shares are spoken for, customers will be placed on a wait-list.
Photo Credit: Spike Jordan / Scottsbluff Star Herald
News Story: Community solar now available in Scottsbluff, Scottsbluff Star Herald
Additional Information:
NPPD’s SunWise Community Solar Pilot Program in Scottsbluff & Venango
NPPD’s Solar FAQs

SOUTH SIOUX CITY’S SOLAR PARK

Project: 2.3-megawatt array (1,200 panels) located on a 21-acre solar park south of the city, alongside C Avenue. The array generates enough energy to provide 5% of South Sioux City’s electrical needs. This is the first Nebraska project for California-based developer Solar City, a Tesla Motors subsidiary.
News Story: Solar is South Sioux City’s latest investment in renewables, Sioux City Journal
Photo Credit: Tim Hynds, Sioux City Journal
Installer: Solar City

STARTRAN’S BUS SHELTER

Photo: Cleaner Greener Lincoln

Project: Off-grid, 24-volt DC solar system installed on a bus shelter in downtown Lincoln, near the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. It powers the bus stop’s LED message boards that provide route time information to passengers.
Source: Cleaner Greener Lincoln’s Renewable Energy Examples
Installer: Dixon Power Systems

STRICTLY BUSINESS IN LINCOLN 

Project: 25-kilowatt system
Installer: J-Tech Solar

TANDERUP FARM NEAR NELIGH

Courtesy Photo

Project: 9-kilowatt photovoltaic system
Installers: MarLin Wind & Solar and Knopik Engineering

TD AMERITRADE’S LEED PLATINUM HEADQUARTERS BUILDING

News Story: TD Ameritrade Calls New LEED Platinum Headquarters, Home, Green Building News .
Photo Credit: Green Building News

TELESIS INC’S NET-ZERO ENERGY BUSINESS COMPLEX IN LINCOLN’S HAYMARKET

Project: J-Tech Solar collaborated with SWT Energy on this nearly 300-kilowatt photovoltaic system on top of the former Meadow Gold Dairy House at Seventh and M Streets in Lincoln’s historic Haymarket. The business complex is now owned by Telesis, Inc. With 940 solar panels, the array is one of the largest privately-owned solar projects in Nebraska.

J-Tech’s thirteen-member installation crew worked closely with restoration contractors to integrate the system into existing and historical structures. Federal tax incentives, rebates from Lincoln Electric System and the steady rise in the cost of electricity were driving factors in the owner’s decision to complete such a large project. Also, the price of solar systems has decreased more than 62% since 2009.
News Story: Telesis going for net-zero energy use in Dairy House complex, by Nicholas Bergin, Lincoln Journal Star
Designer: SWT Energy
Installer: J-Tech Solar

TIM & PAM’S WORKSHOP IN HASTINGS

30 solar panels installed on the workshop roof. Tim and Pam, who are retired educators, became the first Hastings Utilities customers to take advantage of LB 436, which allows participants to connect co-generation installations. They plan to install 30 more solar panels this year.
Nebraska TV Video: Retired Educators Get First Solar Panels in Hastings
Photo Credit: Hastings Tribune

TONY’S DO-IT-YOURSELF PROJECT IN BENNET

Project: 2.7-kilowatt, 10-panel, pole-mounted photovoltaic system, net metered, to offset his power costs. The array consists of eight Axitec 280-watt poly panels and two 250-watt Renogy poly panels, and five APSystems yc500i microinverters. Solar system’s angle is adjustable.
Installers: Tony and his employer, owner of Salt Valley Electric Inc.

TOTAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY’S OFFICE IN LINCOLN

Project: 5.3-kilowatt dual-axis solar tracking photovoltaic system at Total Manufacturing Company (TMCO) in the Haymarket District, was funded in part by Lincoln Electric System’s sustainable energy program.
Source: Cleaner Greener Lincoln’s Renewable Energy Examples
Installer: SWT Energy 

UNITARIAN CHURCH OF LINCOLN
Lincoln Unitarian Church

Project: 25-kilowatt (100 panels) south-facing solar array.  The church has also installed a geothermal heating and cooling system, energy efficient lighting and a number of other energy and water conservation features.
News Stories: Unitarian Church of Lincoln expansion, by Tessa Lighty, Lincoln Journal Star
Renovated Unitarian Church is more Earth-friendly, by Erin Anderson, Lincoln Journal Star
Installer: Dixon Power Systems

Photo: Lincoln Journal Star

Photos: Lincoln Journal Star