Apple’s Government-Approved Solar Plans and What They Mean for Utilities

By Indran Ratnathicam, Vice President, Marketing & Strategy at First Fuel. Published by Renewable Energy World

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The U.S. government has granted Apple approval to sell the company’s excess solar energy under the name Apple Energy LLC. If Apple becoming an energy “provider,” in addition to consumer, doesn’t serve as a proof point of the massive change happening in the utility industry today, not much else will. This move not only means Apple can now offload its surplus and make some extra cash; it also signals mounting pressure for traditional utilities to innovate, or else risk seeing customers turn elsewhere for energy services. Commercial customers make up over half the overall load and revenue at a typical utility — in smaller numbers and greater concentration than residential customers — and increasingly are taking matters into their own hands to meet their energy needs . . .  In a recent survey by PriceWaterhouseCoopers, 72 percent of U.S. companies indicated that they are actively pursuing procurement of clean energy. Read more here.
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To learn about other large U.S. companies increasing access to renewable energy, visit: Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers’ Principles.Org.

The Buyers’ Principles have outlined six criteria to help companies meet their ambitious renewable-energy purchasing goals.